Sick building


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Sick building

A building which causes a higher than normal level of minor illness to its occupants. Typical symptoms are irritation to the eyes, nose, or throat; shortage of breath; dizziness; and general fatigue. Sick building syndrome (SBS) is mainly associated with air-conditioned buildings and those that have no user control of ventilation or heating or lighting levels.

sick building

A building in which the indoor air quality is considered to be unacceptable by a high percentage of its occupants.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the emergence of sick building syndrome in the 1970s and the emphasis on LEED standards today, many are becoming interested in the topics of health and sustainability.
Dubai: Sick building syndrome (SBS) is when people have a range of symptoms related to a certain building, most often a workplace, and there is no specific identifiable cause.
This contract is for the replacement of the existing calls sick building wire type system, an identical system with transfer calls to DECT phones display the lodge, and the floors in the housing depending on the direction.
1-2007 requirements, improve indoor air quality and combat sick building syndrome.
Sick building syndrome typically can be traced to a number of sources, from mold or bacteria in ducts to chemicals used in paint or carpeting to fumes from vehicles or manufacturing operations being drawn indoors.
Sick building syndrome and related illness; prevention and remediation of mold contamination.
When these combine with moisture, it creates ideal conditions for microbial growth--leading to sick building syndrome and associated problems such as an increase in respiratory, allergic and asthmatic and immune system reactions.
Yet most sick building workers would find it hard to get a job as a secretary.
Michelle Murphy, Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics, Technoscience, and Women Workers (Durham, NC: Duke University Press 2006)
Usually sick building syndrome is associated with commercial buildings, but residential homes can also trigger symptoms.
That specificity began trickling down to interiors upon the emergence of sick building syndrome research that revealed the poor air quality in many of Manhattan's buildings was impacting workers performance.
Productivity losses from Sick Building Syndrome are estimated to cost $50 billion annually, according to information from EHS Services Inc.