sickle-cell disease

(redirected from Sickle cell anaemia)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

sickle-cell disease

[′sik·əl ¦sel di‚zēz]
(medicine)
References in periodicals archive ?
Licensing activities and partnerships in the sickle cell anaemia drug market is thoroughly covered by company and licensee with the deal summary.
The incidence of Beta thalassaemia trait and sickle cell anaemia varies between 3 to 17% and 1 to 44% respectively.
The Health Ministry has confirmed some of the 3,700 Bahrainis performing Haj this year have the condition, Bahrain Sickle Cell Anaemia Patient Care Society president Zakreya Al Kadhem told the GDN.
The number of new sickle cell anaemia patients dropped from 913 in 2002 to 247 in 2007, a fall of 73 per cent, he told parliament.
She was 20 and knew she had the genetic disorder sickle cell anaemia but had so far life been lucky, escaping the excruciating attacks which characterise the condition.
Dr Stanton said the screening would enable babies who test positive for sickle cell anaemia to begin immediate specialist treatment.
Sickle cell anaemia is a genetic disease characterised by the sickling of red blood cells in patients suffering from hypoxia (around 100,000 cases in Europe and North America).
4] In the present study, 11 children were diagnosed as having Sickle cell anaemia (21.
People can pay BD5 each for a chance to attempt the feat and money raised will be presented to the Bahrain Sickle Cell Anaemia Patient Care Society, which will put it towards the purchase of a blood transfusion machine.
On his Part, Bahrain Society for Sickle Cell Anaemia Patient Care Board Chairman Zakariya Ibrahim Kadhim hailed the Representatives Council Speaker's care and follow-up on the sickle cell patients in Bahrain.
Recently, Health Secretary Alan Milburn announced plans to introduce a national screening programme of all mothers and babies for sickle cell anaemia and thalassaemia.
A young girl with Sickle Cell Anaemia met up with two top Midland footballers who lent their support to a campaign to raise awareness of the blood disorder.