sickle-cell disease

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Related to Sickle-cell: Sickle cell crisis

sickle-cell disease

[′sik·əl ¦sel di‚zēz]
(medicine)
References in periodicals archive ?
People with sickle-cell disease may have the following symptoms: anaemia, fatigue, mild jaundice, slight yellowing in the whites of the eyes, pain in the limbs and abdomen and susceptibility to infection, leading to frequent colds and illnesses.
The findings suggest that sildenafil and other vessel dilators that show a benefit in the lungs could benefit such sickle-cell patients, he says.
That's what scientist Tim Townes did when he "created" designer mice to study sickle-cell disease.
For decades, scientists assumed that the cells' shape was the primary cause of vessel blockage in sickle-cell patients.
Leboulch and his team took bone marrow from mice with sickle-cell disease and added the modified gene to it.
In people with sickle-cell disease, however, hemoglobin doesn't hold onto oxygen well.
Sickle-cell anemia is caused by an abnormal form of hemoglobin, an oxygen-carrying molecule in the blood.
More important, mice with the sickle-cell mutation in their added human beta-globin gene experienced anemia, liver and kidney damage, and enlarged spleens.
The results of a randomized placebo-controlled, blinded, multicenter trial involving 55 SCD patients treated once weekly for up to 10 weeks suggest that ARGIDENE(TM) Gel may significantly promote and accelerate the healing of chronic sickle-cell leg ulcers.
Investigators at 21 medical centers across the United States began the trial by recruiting 299 people with moderate to severe sickle-cell disease.
People who inherit hemoglobin S genes from both parents can develop the oftenfatal sickle-cell anemia.