Sicyon


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Related to Sicyon: Cleisthenes, Corinth

Sicyon

(sĭsh`ēŏn, sĭs`–), ancient city of Greece, in the Peloponnesus, NW of Corinth and 2 mi (3.2 km) S of the Gulf of Corinth. Sicyon was founded by Argos and attained its greatest power under the tyrant CleisthenesCleisthenes,
fl. 510 B.C., Athenian statesman. He was the head of his family, the Alcmaeonidae, after the exile of Hippias, and with Spartan help had made himself undisputed ruler of Athens by 506 B.C.
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 in the 6th cent. B.C. Under the leadership of the general AratusAratus,
d. 213 B.C., Greek statesman and general of Sicyon, prime mover and principal leader of the Second Achaean League. His objective at first was to free the Peloponnesus from Macedonian domination, and he is credited with bringing into the confederation many of the
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, Sicyon joined (3d cent. B.C.) the Achaean League. With the destruction (146 B.C.) of Corinth by the Romans, Sicyon briefly regained power but subsequently declined. Sicyon was an important center of art. In the archaic period of Greek art (625–480 B.C.) it was famous for painting and pottery. In the 4th cent. B.C. the Sicyonic school of painting, founded by EupompusEupompus
, fl. 4th cent. B.C., Greek painter, founder of the Sicyonic school. The only one of his works of which there is record is A Victor in the Olympic Games.
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, produced such artists as Pamphilus and ApellesApelles
, fl. 330 B.C., Greek painter, the most celebrated in antiquity but now known only through descriptions of his works. He is thought to have studied under Ephorus of Ephesus and under Pamphilus of Amphipolis at Sicyon.
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.

Sicyon

an ancient city in S Greece, in the NE Peloponnese near Corinth: declined after 146 bc
References in periodicals archive ?
The scene is also ironically conceived in terms of its relationship to the previous ones of Antony's treatment of the messenger from Sicyon and Cleopatra's treatment of the marriage-news messenger, but it makes an interesting contrast with Antony's behaviour towards his household servants in IV.
Similarly, the cruelty and machinations of Euphron, leader of a populist coup that left him tyrant of Sicyon, so reminded Mitford of French excesses that he observed "almost the whole of this history of Euphron might seem, instead of having been written two thousand three hundred years ago, an account of transactions within the last three years from the time of first editing this volume" (5: 169).
The Romans preferred to use repeated field campaigns to compel fortified cities to surrender, and other ancient princes, such as Aratus of Sicyon, had "a hidden virtue" by which they took cities through "fraudulent and nocturnal expeditions" (Discourses 2.
Thus Lasos, who founded the dithyrambic contests at Athens, has also been connected with the acoustic experiments of his contemporary, Epigonus of Sicyon.
One of the lives that Plutarch composed for his book is that of Aratus of Sicyon (271-213 BC), not a philosopher-poet but a general and political leader.
Demosthenes had arrived and seen there was nothing to be done, and returned to Athens with the fleet after a profitless raid on Sicyon.
Born in Sparta about 265, the son of Leonidas II; became king on his father's death (235); became involved in war with the Achaean League under Aratus of Sicyon (229); defeated Aratus at Lycaeum, but suffered the loss of Mantinea soon after (227); defeated Aratus again at Laodicea (November?
Atreus, having killed Aerope, the mother of Agamemnon and Menelaus, now married Pelopia, thinking her the daughter of King Thesprotus of Sicyon.
44) Simo rewrites Harpax's swift travel from Sicyon as the consequence of strength training from shackles (1175-6).
In Alexandria, Antony receives letters containing the details of Fulvia's death in Sicyon (1.
18) Menaichmos of Sicyon, [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], FGrH 131 F 4 (Ath.
Although Hesiod's list became the standard in later times, it was not the only one; at both Delphi and Sicyon there were only three Muses.