Sicyon

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Related to Sicyonians: Corinth, Cleisthenes, Mycenae, Macedonia, Thebes

Sicyon

(sĭsh`ēŏn, sĭs`–), ancient city of Greece, in the Peloponnesus, NW of Corinth and 2 mi (3.2 km) S of the Gulf of Corinth. Sicyon was founded by Argos and attained its greatest power under the tyrant CleisthenesCleisthenes,
fl. 510 B.C., Athenian statesman. He was the head of his family, the Alcmaeonidae, after the exile of Hippias, and with Spartan help had made himself undisputed ruler of Athens by 506 B.C.
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 in the 6th cent. B.C. Under the leadership of the general AratusAratus,
d. 213 B.C., Greek statesman and general of Sicyon, prime mover and principal leader of the Second Achaean League. His objective at first was to free the Peloponnesus from Macedonian domination, and he is credited with bringing into the confederation many of the
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, Sicyon joined (3d cent. B.C.) the Achaean League. With the destruction (146 B.C.) of Corinth by the Romans, Sicyon briefly regained power but subsequently declined. Sicyon was an important center of art. In the archaic period of Greek art (625–480 B.C.) it was famous for painting and pottery. In the 4th cent. B.C. the Sicyonic school of painting, founded by EupompusEupompus
, fl. 4th cent. B.C., Greek painter, founder of the Sicyonic school. The only one of his works of which there is record is A Victor in the Olympic Games.
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, produced such artists as Pamphilus and ApellesApelles
, fl. 330 B.C., Greek painter, the most celebrated in antiquity but now known only through descriptions of his works. He is thought to have studied under Ephorus of Ephesus and under Pamphilus of Amphipolis at Sicyon.
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Sicyon

an ancient city in S Greece, in the NE Peloponnese near Corinth: declined after 146 bc
References in periodicals archive ?
The myth gives two versions of Heracles -- the hero whom the Sicyonians had venerated and the god whom Phaestus honoured.
For the Sicyonians, the cult of Heracles at the Paidize manages to combine two normally exclusive identities: Heracles is both a god and a hero.
GREEK TEXT OMITTED] Herodotus makes no actual mention of such pollution at Sicyon in the context of the proposed expulsion of Adrastus; this need not be significant, for Cleisthenes may have considered himself primarily to be freeing the Sicyonian community of the metaphorical pollution of Argiveness.
GREEK TEXT OMITTED] in a measure associated with the attempted expulsion of Adrastus, the renaming of the Sicyonian tribes after pigs and asses.
It is unclear how or why Sicyonians were compelled to join in (7.