side effect

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side effect

[′sīd i‚fekt]
(computer science)
A consistent result of a procedure that is in addition to or peripheral to the basic result.
References in periodicals archive ?
People with the alpha-adducin variant were twice as likely to avoid serious side effects, including heart attacks and strokes, if they took diuretics than if they took other types of antihypertension drugs.
The risk associated with the rotavirus vaccine's side effects is lower than the risk of injury associated with most car trips and some antibiotics given to treat children with infections, Poland says.
For other side effects, such as diabetes, erectile dysfunction and hot flashes, most respondents underestimated the actual prevalence.
Inside every pack of medication is a patient information leaflet that contains a list of potential side effects.
To clear some of the haze surrounding side effects, scientists from Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital Boston created a network linking 809 medications to 852 side effects known as of 2005.
The investigators found no significant differences between the two formulations in participants' expectations or experience of physical or sexual side effects.
The highest number of side effects was in survivors with hematologic, head and neck, lung, alimentary, gynecologic, and breast cancers.
But severe side effects and the cumbersome number of different pills that patients must take every day have hampered the drugs' overall performance.
Much controversy swirls in the debate over how best to mitigate the harmful side effects of automotive transportation.
This treatment is not only very expensive, it is also of questionable value and carries with it the risk of serious side effects.
Peer support and education about hepatitis C, side effects of therapy, and access to mental health care must be provided as well.
A Cambodian organization of sex workers had protested the trial, which was to recruit HIV-negative sex workers at high risk of infection, primarily because it did not include at least 30 years of insurance in case of side effects from the drug.