side chain

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side chain

[′sīd ‚chān]
(organic chemistry)
A grouping of similar atoms (two or more, generally carbons, as in the ethyl radical, C2H5‒) that branches off from a straight-chain or cyclic (for example, benzene) molecule. Also known as branch; branched chain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Developed over a twelve-month period, I/O Chameleon is a framework which will allow for the creation of any number of unique and interoperable I/O Digital sidechains.
2]-3,5,3',5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, and E2, it appears that SULT1E1 is able to bind these structurally diverse compounds with only minor changes in a few sidechain residues and small shifts in loop 84-89 (see Supplemental Material, Figures S5 and S6).
This suggests that absorbance for the biuret reaction product of albumin was the sum of peptide backbone and sidechain interactions with copper.
Structural data show that these two enzymes have similar active sites (a triad of amino acid sidechains involved in their catalytic mechanisms).
where n represents the moles of tetrafluoroethylene monomer units per mole of the vinyl ether sidechain.
19) and Winandy (32) showed that initial strength loss in wood appears to be related to the removal of sidechain hemicellulose components.
Doug Grotjahn's (San Diego State) contribution looked at metal coordination from the angle of bioconjugation of Ru to aromatic amino acid sidechain, offering a mild labelling method for proteins.
Sidechain remix - DJs can create seven different dynamic audio effects with touches and movements on the screen.
We hypothesized that the adult ovary is susceptible to BPA in vivo and that long-term exposure to low concentrations of BPA disrupts 17[beta]-estradiol (E2) production by granulosa cells via the alteration of steroidogenic proteins in ovarian cells, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), P450 sidechain cleavage (P450scc), 3[beta]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3[beta]-HSD), cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1), and aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom).
No pyridine sidechain, unlike telithromycin; the pyridine moiety is believed responsible for certain adverse effects observed with telithromycin (Ketek).
Although strain hardening in elongation is not typical for linear polyethylenes, similar results have been obtained with other bimodal materials, and the possible reason for strain hardening is considered to be the presence of either sidechain branching or a very high molecular weight tail, but this is still under discussion (69-71).
Figure 1 shows the structures of some phytosterols; cholesterol has the campesterol-sitosterol type of structure but lacks a sidechain at [C.