sidewalk

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sidewalk

US and Canadian a hard-surfaced path for pedestrians alongside and a little higher than a road

Sidewalk

Walkway along the side of a road, or leading to a building, usually constructed of flagstone, brick, or concrete.

sidewalk

[′sīd‚wȯk]
(civil engineering)
A walkway for pedestrians on the side of a street or road.
A foot pavement.

sidewalk

A paved footwalk at the side of a street or roadway.

Sidewalk

(1) See Sidewalk Labs.

(2) A Microsoft service that was launched in 1997 to provide online arts and entertainment guides on the Web for major cities worldwide. In 1999, Microsoft sold Sidewalk to Ticketmaster, which continued to provide guides, ticketing and other information to the MSN network.
References in classic literature ?
John Brown, on the opposite sidewalk, portly and comfortable, with his furred cloak thrown open, disclosing a handsome surtout beneath.
Behind the police rearguard, at a respectful distance, was an orderly but vociferous mob, several blocks in length, that congested the street from sidewalk to sidewalk.
And then, on the crowded sidewalks there were persons innumerable whose attention he attracted.
The sidewalks were superb marble slabs polished as smooth as glass, and the curbs that separated the walks from the broad street were also set thick with clustered emeralds.
In the sky beyond the crest of a hill toward which I groped my way along precarious plank sidewalks and across miry, unpaved streets I could see the faint glow of the city's lights, but behind me nothing was visible but a single window of Moxon's house.
They went their ways with great haste and definiteness, withal there was a curious indecision in their movements, as though they expected the buildings to topple over on them or the sidewalks to sink under their feet or fly up in the air.
Crowds were gathering along the sidewalks to view the emperor's entry into the city.
Velvet lawns, broken only by cement sidewalks, ran down to the gutters.
It was a fine afternoon, with a gray sky and dry sidewalks.
There was a short, narrow, gloomy lane or street, shut in between lofty dwelling houses, the lane often dark, always filthy, without sidewalks, a gutter running through the centre, over which, suspended from a rope, hung a dim oil lamp or two--such was the Rue St.
The corn was shoulder high and had been planted right down to the sidewalk.
Two women-servants came out with pails and brooms and brushes, and gave the sidewalk a thorough scrubbing; meanwhile two others scrubbed the four marble steps which led up to the door; beyond these we could see some men-servants taking up the carpet of the grand staircase.