Sifting Machine

Sifting Machine

 

a machine used to separate the products of grain milling by means of flat sieves that make successive circular movements on a horizontal plane. Sifting machines became widespread in the late 19th century; in Russia they were first produced in 1888.

The main parts of a sifting machine are the drive mechanism and the set of sieves mounted in the housing. Machines can have one or two housings, crank or self-balancing drive, and varying numbers of units where different mixtures can be simultaneously separated. The mixture being separated falls from one horizontal or sometimes slightly inclined sieve to another, is sifted, and forms usually from three to six groups, whose particles differ in size.

Sifting machines are used primarily in the processing of flour and groats.

REFERENCES

Sokolov, A. Ia. Tekhnologicheskoe oborudovanie predpriiatii po khraneniiu i pererabolke zerna, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1967.
Gortinskii, V. V., A. B. Demskii, and M. A. Boriskin. Protsessy separirovaniia na zernopererabatyvaiushchikh predpriiatiiakh. Moscow, 1973.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of the war, the number of Syrians working here has doubled," the 32-year-old says, his voice nearly drowned out by the sound of the sifting machine he operates for around 12 hours a day.
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In the late 1960s, high-speed PVC cylindrical pipes with a felt rubbing on them (to produce static electricity) were mounted on the conveyor belts of winnowers and sifting machines to remove stalk and fiber more efficiently.