Sigatoka


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Sigatoka

[‚sig·ə′tō·kə]
(plant pathology)
Leaf-spot disease of banana caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella musicola.
References in periodicals archive ?
The projects second component, vegetable marketing extension in Sigatoka valley, will create competitive market links by emphasizing seasonal adjustments to production and cropping systems, thereby ensuring the sustainability of the local agricultural sector and of communities living in the area.
a member of the Stockton Group (STK), announced today that the Philippine's Bureau of Agriculture and Fisheries Standards has approved the full registration of Timorex Gold use in Black Sigatoka disease.
causes the black sigatoka leaf spot disease in banana plantations that
Mancozeb is sprayed on bananas to prevent black sigatoka, a fungal disease that impairs fruit ripening and reduces banana yields.
The banana crop is under attack from a host of pests such as weevils and nematodes, and diseases such as black sigatoka, fusarium wilt and bacterial xanthomonas wilt (BXW).
10, 2012 to help growers to control black sigatoka.
Many field workers said they had to buy their own protective equipment and they often worked in fields while chemicals were sprayed from the air to protect against a leaf disease called black Sigatoka.
Swamy said it would be a 30-day shoot, mostly in the Western Division with a few scenes in and around Sigatoka and a couple in Suva.
Baptiste said the Black Sigatoka Disease continues to ravage the banana sector, a significant foreign exchange earner, reports Caribbean360.
Now, in a triple whammy, farmers have been hit by black sigatoka, a fungal disease that ruins crops by ripening bananas quickly on the plant while the skin remains green.
In Ecuador, concerns are rising about the spread of Black Sigatoka disease - the disease can cause a 50% reduction in fruit yield.
Studies in Oceanic culture history: papers presented at Wenner-Gen Symposium on Oceanic Culture History, Sigatoka, Fiji, August 1969, Volume i (Pacific Anthropological Records 11): 47-60.