Sigillaria


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Related to Sigillaria: Lepidodendron, Cordaites

Sigillaria

(sĭjĭlâr`ēə), genus of fossil club moss allied to LepidodendronLepidodendron and Sigillaria
, two principal genera of an extinct group of primitive vascular trees. They dominated the forests of the early Carboniferous period until the ferns gained ascendancy.
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, abundant in the Carboniferous period. The thick trunk was rarely branched and was covered for several feet from the top with erect leaves that were larger than those of Lepidodendron; the leaf scars were in vertical rows. The fossilized root stocks of Sigillaria, as of Lepidodendron, are known as stigmaria. Club mosses are classified in the division LycopodiophytaLycopodiophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of the organisms commonly called club mosses and quillworts. As in other vascular plants, the sporophyte, or spore-producing phase, is the conspicuous generation, and the gametophyte, or gamete-producing phase, is minute.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Observations sur la structure interieure du Sigillaria elegans comparee a celle des Lepidodendron et des Stigmaria et a celle des vegetaux vivants.
floccosa Salpiglossis sinuata CH Corolla Reduced size flowers, CL flowers Sigillaria, Time of reporduction Earlier Chaloneria (both fossils) Veroniocastrum virginicum, Sepals Increased size Veronica chamaedrys Viola odorata CH flowers, Maturation time Earlier CL flowers Viola odorata CH flowers, Whole flower Reduced size CL flowers Vegetative traits Cucurbita argyrosperma Leaf Reduced lobing sororia, C.
For several years, it had been known that Stigmaria found in the underclay of coals was in fact the rhizophore of Sigillaria (Logan 1841; Brown 1846), and to this evidence Dawson was able to add many other convincing proofs (Fig.
But beyond this, Dawson's reconstruction of Sigillaria was based on poorly founded supposition, and this must represent the weakest facet of Dawson's otherwise careful and cautious paleobotanical work.
Finding scalariform tracheids attached to Artisia (his Sternbergia) pith casts, Dawson assumed that at least some of these fossils must have belonged to Sigillaria, based on the common occurrence of scalariform tissue in that plant (Dawson 1859).
at 220 m in the measured section, and at 241 m, by trunk compressions (Lepidodendron sensu latu and Sigillaria cf.
This assemblage represents fire in lowland peat-forming communities dominated by Sigillaria and medullosan pteridosperms.