Silius Italicus


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Silius Italicus

(sĭ`lēo͝os` ĭtă`lĭko͝os), A.D. 25–A.D. 101, Latin poet. An orator and state functionary, Silius was made consul in A.D. 68 and proconsul in Asia Minor in A.D. 77. Retiring to his estate near Naples, he purchased the villas of Cicero and Vergil and made them into museums. His epic on the second Punic war, Punica, an imitation of Vergil's Aeneid, is the longest surviving Latin poem.
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Sometimes the word for "punishment" is a stretch, however, as in Silius Italicus 4.
Classical authors are adduced to document the 'source' of individual ideas and formulations, often in the ethical domain, or to suggest literary models for the narrative: for example, Seneca's Hippolytus as a prototype of lwein's wooing of Laudine; the puellae ancilla of Ovid's Ars amatoria as a model for Lunete; the stories of Philemon and Baucis from Ovid's Metamorphoses, and of Bacchus lodging with the peasant Falernus from the Pontica of Silius Italicus, as literary models for Erec taking lodging with Enite's father.
to rehabilitate and emancipate the epic poems by Vlaerius Flaccus, Statius and Silius Italicus within the history and scholarship of Latin literature.