Bombyx mori

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Related to Silk moth: luna moth, cecropia moth, silkworm moth

Bombyx mori

[′bäm‚biks ′mȯr·ē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The species name of the commercial silkworm.
References in periodicals archive ?
The host plants for the silk moths are also proving to be good hosts for the primary cash crop of the region--vanilla, which comes from the pods of a vining orchid.
The silkworm's evolution into a silk moth functions for Blake as the overarching narrative frame structuring the events of Jerusalem, in large part because it is such an apt metaphor for the simultaneously transformative and annihilating process of regeneration.
The secret was that silk is produced by silk moth caterpillars that spin cocoons of the silky filaments.
Some of the giant silk moths of North America are taking a beating because an early 20th-century attempt to control another insect went bad, researchers in Massachusetts suggest.
Further afield, in Western India, the tussur silk moth, Antheraea mylitta, was considered a sacred animal, its wing spots seen as the chakra or discus of the god Vishnu (Wardle 1891).
National Science Fair and travelled around the world with his exhibit on the hybridization of giant silk moths.
there will be a caterpillar walk at Tower Hill, where facts and insights about the insects will be explained, and giant silk moths can be seen up close.
Male silk moths utilize this organ to recognize pheromone molecules excreted by females as they land on its broad antennae.
By comparison, silk moths have 52, fruit flies have 61, mosquitoes range from 74 to 158 and honeybees have 174.
Roy's talk will focus on the diversity of cloud forest moths and the ecosystem of which they are a part, including tiger moths and silk moths.
The atlas moth, one of the largest silk moths, is so big that it can be mistaken for a bat when flying.
Over thousands of years, during which the Chinese practised sericulture utilising all the different types of silk moths known to them, Bombyx mori evolved into the specialised silk producer it is today; a moth which has lost its power to fly, only capable of mating and producing eggs for the next generation of silk producers.