Silphidae


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Related to Silphidae: Nicrophorus, carrion beetles

Silphidae

[′sil·fə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The carrion beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Staphylinoidea.

Silphidae

 

a family of beetles. Body length, 6–40 mm. The flat, motile larvae resemble wood lice. Of the more than 500 species, 80 are encountered in the USSR. The Silphidae are distributed on all continents, principally in countries with temperate climates. Most silphids, including Silpha obscura and the Necrophorus, feed on carrion. A few species are predators, for example, the beneficial beetle Xylodrepa quadripunctata, which preys on caterpillars that damage orchards and forests. There are some herbivorous silphids; the beetle Aclypea opaca damages sugar beets and other vegetables.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Coleoptera: Silphidae and Agyrtidae, The carrion beetles of Canada and Alaska.
Smith (1986) considered as Coleoptera families with forensic importance: Carabidae, Hydrophilidae, Silphidae, Leiodidae, Staphylinidae, Histeridae, Cleridae, Anthicidae, Dermestidae, Nitidulidae, Rhizophagidae, Ptinidae, Tenebrionidae, Scarabaeidae, Geotrupidae and Trogidae.
Effects of invasive redcedar on capture rates of Nicrophorus americanus and other Silphidae.
En este grupo se encuentran los de las familias Scarabaeidae, Silphidae, Staphylinidae y Trogidae, que agrupan especies degradadoras y depredadoras, las cuales son comunmente atraidas por los excrementos, o las plantas y animales en descomposicion (Moron & Terron 1984, Moron & Lopez-Mendez 1985, Moron et al.
Coleoptera Silphidae Nicrophorus orbicolis Coleoptera Silphidae Nicrophorus pustulantus Coleoptera Staphylinidae Bryoporus rufescens Coleoptera Staphylinidae Dasycerus sp.
Diversidad de escarabajos necrofilos (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Silphidae, Staphylinidae y Trogidae) en una region semiarida del valle de Zapotitlan de las Salinas, Puebla, Mexico.
Coleopterans secondarily colonize the resource and include species from the following families: Histeridae, Staphylinidae, Silphidae and Dermestidae (Payne, 1965; Byrd and Castner, 2010).
These non-colonizing insects include predators and parasites of necrophagous species, such as beetles in the families Silphidae, Staphylinidae, and Histeridae, are useful in succession-based PMI estimations (Anderson 2000), and most of the beetles that are collected during succession studies fall into this category.
The main Coleoptera families of forensic importance and their abundance were: Staphylinidae (1,178), Silphidae (183), Histeridae (18), Nitidulidae (13), Trogidae (8), Cleridae (4), Dermestidae (4), Scarabaeidae (3), Anthicidae (2), Carabidae (2), Tenebrionidae (2) and Leiodidae (1), totalling 1,418 specimens.