Simic, Charles

Simic, Charles

(sĭm`ĭc), 1938–, American poet, b. Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now in Serbia), grad. New York Univ. (B.A., 1966). Simic moved to the United States in 1954, joining his father, who had arrived before World War II. Simic taught at several colleges, most notably from 1974 at the Univ. of New Hampshire, where he is now professor emeritus. He has written more than 60 books, including the poetry collections What the Grass Says (1960), Charon's Cosmology (1977), Unending Blues (1986), The World Doesn't End (1990; Pulitzer Prize), Dime-Store Alchemy (1992, repr 2011), Walking the Black Cat (1996), Jackstraws (1999), The Voice at 3:00 AM (2003), My Noiseless Entourage (2005), That Little Something (2008), New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 (2013), and The Lunatic (2015). His poetry is stark and startlingly original, with touches of ironic humor; his language is plainspoken and accessible, although his imagery is often dark and sometimes bizarre. He also is celebrated for his translations of Yugoslav and French poets, and has written many essays and edited several anthologies. His selected prose was collected in The Life of Images (2015). A former MacArthur fellow (1984–89), Simic was U.S. poet laureatepoet laureate
, title conferred in Britain by the monarch on a poet whose duty it is to write commemorative odes and verse. It is an outgrowth of the medieval English custom of having versifiers and minstrels in the king's retinue, and of the later royal patronage of poets, such
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 in 2007–8.

Bibliography

See his collected memoirs, A Fly in the Soup (2003); M. Hulse, Charles Simic in Conversation with Michael Hulse (2002); B. Weigl, ed., Charles Simic: Essays on the Poetry (1996).

Simic, Charles

(1938–  ) poet; born in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. His father escaped from the violence of World War II to New York City, and his family followed him in 1954. Charles studied at New York University (B.A. 1967), and became an editorial assistant for Aperture, a photography magazine (1966–69). He taught at several institutions, notably the University of New Hampshire (1974). He is praised for his translations of the Yugoslavian poets, and for his own evocative and often surrealistic poetry, as in The Book of Gods and Devils (1990).
References in periodicals archive ?
Different Mysticisms: Simic, Charles Wright, and Mark Strand