Simla Convention

Simla Convention

 

an agreement concluded between McMahon, representing Great Britain, and Lonchen Shatra, representing local Tibetan authorities, on July 3, 1914, in the city of Simla, India. A British draft of the convention was discussed at an Anglo-Chinese-Tibetan conference in Simla in 1913 and 1914. In March 1914, during the conference, McMahon and Shatra exchanged secret letters and maps concerning a line demarcating the eastern part of the frontier between Tibet and British India. The line, which came to be known as the McMahon Line, was later entered on the maps appended to the British draft convention.

The Simla Convention obligated the Chinese government not to annex Tibet and not to send Chinese troops or civilians into Tibet. The Chinese representative, under pressure from the British, at first initialed the British draft convention but later never signed it. The Chinese government refused to recognize the Simla Convention.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Simla Convention of 1914 led to a landmark international Agreement.
The first Chinese Premier Zhou En Lai had written to Indian prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru rejecting latter's contention that the border was based on 1914 treaty of Simla Convention, adding that Chinese government had not accepted McMohan Line as legal.
PRC authorities questioned the validity of the Simla Convention by challenging Tibet's autonomy to authorize treaties between entities.
Others concurred that "It is true that China never ratified the Simla Convention and, therefore, it never came into force" (S.
The Chinese say it " approximates the illegal McMahon Line", a boundary created by the 1914 Simla Convention which the Chinese representative initialled, but did not sign.