Simon's theory

Simon's theory

[′sī·mənz ‚thē·ə·rē]
(engineering)
A theory of drilling which includes the effects of drilling by percussion and by vibration with a rotary (oil well) bit, cable tool, and pneumatic hammer; the rate of penetration of a chisel-shaped bit into brittle rock may be defined as follows: R = NA ƒv D, where R equals the rate of advance of bit, N equals the number of wings of bit, ƒv equals the number of impacts per unit time, D equals the diameter of the bit, and A equals the cross-sectional area of the crater at the periphery of the drill hole.
References in periodicals archive ?
A BRIEF CRITIQUE OF WILLIAM SIMON'S THEORY OF LEGAL AND ACADEMIC
Critiquing Simon's Theory of Academics' Law Practice
This Reply explores Simon's theory and his implementation of
Part I points out problems with Simon's theory about how
Whatever one may otherwise think of Simon's theory, his experiment
Simon's theory addresses two aspects of professional practice.
At bottom, Simon's theory strikes a new balance between
Simon's theory calls for greater transparency, particularly in
A main idea of these early works was Simon's theory of "bounded rationality," that human and organizational decision-making is significantly limited by both weaknesses in intelligence and a lack of sufficient information.
This summary sounds like an assault on Simon's theory, but I do not mean it to be.
In the phone bill example, Simon's theory fails the agent-relativity condition.
In this way, Simon's theory simultaneously makes the lawyer's ethical task more challenging, and diminishes the resources lawyers have available to meet the challenge.