Simon Marmion


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Marmion, Simon

 

BornWca 1425 in Amiens (?); died Dec. 24, 1489, in Valenciennes. French painter.

Marmion was a miniature painter. Examples of his miniatures appear in Great French Chronicles (c. 1454-58, M. E. SaltykovShchedrin Public Library, Leningrad). His book illustrations, which reflect the tradition of 15th-century southern Dutch painting, resemble easel paintings in that they have detailed compositions, lifelike portraits, and subtle landscapes. Marmion also painted the Retable of St. Bertin (1450’s, Berlin-Dahlem Picture Gallery and other museums).

REFERENCES

Chernova, G. A. Miniatiury “Bol’shikh frantsuzskikh khronik.” Moscow, 1960.
Hofmann, E.-W. “Simon Marmion Reconsidered.” Scriptorium, 1963, vol. 23, pp. 243-71.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historians of art and books, and medievalists, most from the Low Countries, consider such topics as heritage and innovation in Flemish book illumination at the turn of the 16th century from Simon Marmion to Gerard David, a Dutch book of hours printed by Wolfgang Hopyl in Paris in 1500 as an example of illustrations in early printed books and manuscript illumination, how Flemish polyphony traveled in manuscript culture, theater and politics in Brussels at the time of Philip as exemplified by the Leemans Collection, politics and print at the time of Philip the Fair, and printing as a long-term revolution.
In spite of such august rivalry, the heroes of Illuminating the Renaissance are Simon Marmion and Simon Bening, which is a special triumph for Marmion, since his illuminations, gifted though they are, do not match the technical accomplishment and contemplative vision of his panel-paintings, such as his St Bertin polyptych in Berlin.
Other artists and their ateliers from this time in Flanders are routinely highly praised, for instance Jean le Tavernier, Simon Marmion, and the Girart de Roussillon Master.
Among the artists represented are Simon Bening, Gerard Horenbout, Simon Marmion and Taddeo Crivelli.
This is a field that still offers extraordinary treasures, and here was everything from one of the oldest English books surviving in private hands--a Gospel of St Luke of around 1120-40--to the fabulous and extraordinarily tiny Korner Hours, thought to have been made for Charles the Bold or a member of his immediate family around 1475-80 and illuminated by two of the most significant artists of the middle ages, Simon Marmion and the so-called Master of Mary of Burgundy.