sine curve

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sine curve

[′sīn ‚kərv]
(mathematics)
The graph of y =sin x, where x and y are Cartesian coordinates. Also known as sinusoid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bandwidth of a real waveform is the highest sine wave frequency component that is significant.
The term that describes how a sine wave differential signal is affected by an interconnect when it exits is the differential insertion loss, sometimes referred to by its S-parameter designation, SDD21.
0-second wavefiles containing an equal mix of four synthesized sine waves (500 Hz, 1400 Hz, 2600 Hz, and 3400 Hz), peaking at 1.
For example, a cross-correlation between two identical sine waves having peak quantization levels of [+ or -] 30,000 and [+ or -] 15,000 would result in a cross-correlation value of 1 (with m = 0), just as if the [+ or -] 30,000 or [+ or -] 15,000 signals were compared to themselves.
The size of the impedance of this system can be expressed by taking the ratio of the size of the voltage sine wave (in volts) to that of the current sine wave (in amperes).
The noise is spread over a wide range of frequencies, and the amplitude of the sine waves varies enormously with frequency.
Historically, when sine waves scatter off an interconnect, their response is called the Scattering Parameters, or S-Parameters.
They did this by looking at paleomagnetic studies of the rocks to determine the direction of the past field, and by using the plane along which the stromatolitic sine waves grew to define the past north-south plane of the earth and its spin axis.
While traditional wireless technology uses sine waves and operates in a specific frequency, Time Domain's PulsON technology sends millions of low power pulses per second across a wide spectrum.
Fullerton's method is different from current wireless communication because it transmits audio, video and other data in precisely timed pulses, instead of the traditional continuous sine waves.
Users can also map a video channel to geometric shapes, such as spheres, sine waves and raindrops.
This interference results in a very accurate sine wave signal with a pitch that is 1/4 times the scale pitch.