Singing


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.

singing

[′siŋ·iŋ]
(control systems)
An undesired, self-sustained oscillation in a system or component, at a frequency in or above the passband of the system or component; generally due to excessive positive feedback.

Singing

 

(vocal art), performing music with the voice; the art of conveying the ideas and form of a work of music by means of the singing voice; one of the oldest forms of musical art. Singing does not necessarily involve the use of words (see VOCALIZATION). There are several types of singing: solo, or one-voiced singing; ensemble singing (the duet [two voices], the trio [three voices], the quartet [four voices], and so forth), and choral singing. Although most songs are performed with instrumental accompaniment, some are performed a cappella, or without accompaniment. In classical music there are two principal genres of singing: the operatic genre, which is associated with drama, or with a theatrical presentation, and which incorporates all types of vocal art, and chamber singing, or the performance of art songs and songs, usually by a soloist or small ensemble. In light music the corresponding genres are the operetta and the variety stage, which includes many styles (for example, folk singing, declamation, the singsong, and singing into a microphone). The voice must be specially trained and developed for the performance of music at the professional level.

Vocal melodies are constructed in three principal ways, each of which is associated with a specific manner of singing. The melodious style demands broad, flowing, legato singing, or cantilena. In the declamatory style, the singing reproduces the structure and intonation of speech (recitatives, monologues). In the coloratura style, the melody departs from the words, to some extent. It is highly embellished, containing entire passages that are sung to single vowels or syllables.

Each of the national schools of singing is characterized by a style of performance, a way of producing sound, and a particular quality of sound. As a historically shaped stylistic tendency, a national school of singing develops with the emergence of a national school of composition that makes certain artistic and performance demands on singers. A national singing style reflects a nationality’s performance traditions; peculiarities of language, temperament, and character; and other typical qualities.

The first European school of singing was the Italian school, which developed at the beginning of the 17th century. Distinguished for their mastery of bel canto and for their brilliant voices, many representatives of the Italian school won international recognition. The vocal quality of the Italian language and the ease with which the human voice can perform Italian melodies made it possible to take full advantage of the potentialities of the voice mechanism. The Italian school developed the standard classical sound that has generally been adopted by other national schools.

The high level of the Italian art of singing influenced the formation and development of other national schools, including the French, German, and Russian schools. The French school is distinguished by declamatory elements associated with the melodious declamation practiced by actors in the French classical tragedy. In its development the German school met the demands made on performers by the vocal works of the greatest German and Austrian composers. The Russian school, a unique approach to singing, is based on the style in which folk songs are performed. It developed under the influence of the artistic demands made by the creative work of the Russian classical composers M. I. Glinka, A. S. Dargomyzhskii, M. P. Mussorgsky, A. P. Borodin, N. A. Rimsky-Korsakov, and P. I. Tchaikovsky. The style of its most outstanding representatives, including O. A. Petrov, F. I. Chaliapin, L. V. Sobinov, and A. V. Nezhdanova, was characterized by masterful dramatic acting, simplicity, soulful execution, and the ability to combine singing with the living word colored with psychological meaning. The Soviet vocal school follows the traditions of the Russian school.

REFERENCES

L’vov, M. L. Iz istorii vokal’nogo iskusstva. Moscow, 1964.
Morozov, V. P. Tainy vokal’noi rechi. Leningrad, 1967.
Nazarenko, I. K. Iskusstvo peniia, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1968.
Dmitriev, L. B. Osnovy vokal’noi metodiki. Moscow, 1968.
Lauri-Volpi, G. Vokal’nye paralleli. Leningrad, 1972. (Translated from Italian.)
Ewen, D. Encyclopedia of the Opera. New York, 1955.

L. B. DMITRIEV

What does it mean when you dream about singing?

Singing in a dream may signify a happy feeling of freeing up the emotional self from restrictions.

References in classic literature ?
Suddenly the music grew louder and sweeter, and the Fairies knelt, and bowed their heads, as on through the crowd of loving subjects came the Queen, while the air was filled with gay voices singing to welcome her.
All Fairy-Land was dressed in flowers, and the soft wind went singing by, laden with their fragrant breath.
Moreover, my voice is not in tune today, and I would not spoil even a tolerable song by ill singing.
You don't - well, I will just give you an idea of Harris's comic singing, and then you can judge of it for yourself.
Nervous pianist commences prelude over again, and Harris, commencing singing at the same time, dashes off the first two lines of the First Lord's song out of "Pinafore.
She no longer sang as a child, there was no longer in her singing that comical, childish, painstaking effect that had been in it before; but she did not yet sing well, as all the connoisseurs who heard her said: "It is not trained, but it is a beautiful voice that must be trained.
He sat down abruptly, almost cataleptically, drew his head away from the clutch of her hands and out of the entanglement of her hair, and, his nose thrust upward at an angle of forty-five degrees, he began to quiver and to breathe audibly in rhythm to the rhythm of her singing.
For Villa Kennan was quick to seize upon the howling her singing induced and to develop it.
Their principal employment in the study was to clear out East's table; removing the drawers and ornaments and tablecloth; for he lived in the bottom passage, and his table was in requisition for the singing.
Then silence being made, Warner reminds them of the old School-house custom of drinking the healths, on the first night of singing, of those who are going to leave at the end of the half.
Well, so we shan't be singing any more now," she added, turning towards the house.
Saxon sang in a clear, true soprano, thin but sweet, and she was aware that she was singing to Billy.