microorganism

(redirected from Single-celled Organisms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

microorganism

[¦mī·krō′ȯr·gə‚niz·əm]
(microbiology)
A microscopic organism, including bacteria, protozoans, yeast, viruses, and algae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some single-celled organisms, such as the Ichthyosporea parasite, belong here too.
Ranging from single-celled organisms to large seaweeds, they are the world's most abundant form of plant life and, via photosynthesis, are extremely efficient at using sunlight and carbon dioxide from the air to make organic material such as sugars, proteins and, under the right conditions, oils.
A researcher at Virginia Tech aims to replicate the locomotion mechanism of single-celled organisms to create ultrasmall robots that can access spaces even smaller than the robots themselves.
The mechanism that researchers sought to explain is how an intein--a type of protein found in single-celled organisms and bacteria--cuts itself out of the host protein and reconnects the two remaining strands.
More astonishing is that even those single-celled organisms that many of us tortured in junior high school, the paramecia, are trainable.
Next month's article on microbial genomics will look into the unique potential applications related to sequencing the genomes of single-celled organisms.
The archaea, single-celled organisms confused with bacteria until Woese's discovery, are of interest to biologists studying the origin of life because they have certain primitive features and a liking for extreme environments, like the boiling springs of Yellowstone National Park and the superheated waters that swirl from deep-sea volcanoes.
TEHRAN (FNA)- All multicellular creatures are descended from single-celled organisms.
The universality of the genetic code common to all living things is consistent with the theory of evolution that all living things descended from single-celled organisms.
The surprising abundance of bacteria and single-celled organisms called archaea, roughly 130,000 cells per thimbleful in the lightless lake, ends a decades-long hunt for evidence of life wedged under the Antarctic ice.
More than 500 million years ago, single-celled organisms on the Earth's surface began forming multicellular clusters that ultimately became plants and animals.
I teach a non-majors microbiology class and used "Proteus" to illustrate the multitude of forms of single-celled organisms.

Full browser ?