sinusitis

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sinusitis

inflammation of the membrane lining a sinus, esp a nasal sinus

Sinusitis

 

an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses in man and animals. In humans, acute sinusitis usually arises as a complication of influenza, acute respiratory diseases, or other infectious diseases; chronic sinusitis develops from acute sinusitis that has not been completely cured.

The general symptoms of acute sinusitis include elevated body temperature, headache, abundant nasal discharge, and difficulty in breathing through the nose, most often on one side. With chronic sinusitis, there is usually no increase in body temperature and the other symptoms are less pronounced. Localization of the process determines the symptoms. Sinusitis may be catarrhal or purulent, depending on the type of inflammation. With chronic sinusitis, proliferations of the mucosa (polyps) often form in the paranasal sinuses and the nasal cavity.

Several different forms of sinusitis are distinguished, depending on which sinus is affected. The most common form is maxillary sinusitis, which is an inflammation of the maxillary sinus. With frontal sinusitis, the frontal sinus becomes inflamed; with ethmoid sinusitis, the ethmoidal labyrinth; and with sphenoid sinusitis, the sphenoidal sinus. Sometimes the inflammatory process spreads to all the paranasal sinuses on one or both sides (pansinusitis). Treatment includes the use of medicinal agents, the administration of heat (hot-water bag, compress), and physical therapy. Sometimes surgical treatment is indicated. Prophylaxis includes the timely treatment of the cause of the disease. [23–1294–]

sinusitis

[‚sī·nə′sīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of a paranasal sinus.
References in periodicals archive ?
A recurrent sinus infection was plaguing Julie, a 54-year-old patient of mine.
Q HOW CAN YOU TELL WHETHER A SINUS INFECTION IS BACTERIAL OR VIRAL?
According to Rachel Brummert, "A first-line of defense antibiotic like Amoxicillin would have resolved my sinus infection, and I would not have been exposed to the relatively disproportionate risks of known fluoroquinolone-associated injury, which includes a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, from which I will never recover.
I actually had a flare-up, and ran temperatures along with the typical symptoms of a sinus infection while on a 5-pack of antibiotics.
The researchers randomly assigned 166 adults with sinus infections to get either amoxicillin or a placebo three times a day for 10 days.
The guidelines - the first developed by IDSA on this topic - provide specific characteristics of the illness to help doctors distinguish between viral and bacterial sinus infections.
When I feel a cold coming on - the precursor to that nasty aforementioned sinus infection - I do two things immediately: I start gargling with salt water, once every couple of hours or so, and I snort a saline solution, available over-the-counter under such monikers as Ocean Saline Nasal Spray.
Sinus infections sometimes clear on their own, but they often require antibiotics.
David Spiro, a pediatrician and professor at Oregon Health and Science University, commented on the rate of antibiotic treatment for sinus infections, suggesting that it is "extremely high for a condition that, for the most part, self-resolves.
Gagan had a history of sinus infections which were medically diagnosed and correlated with the presence of colored nasal discharge.
Patients with debilitating and painful chronic sinus infections may no longer need to worry about developing resistance to the antibiotics they rely on for symptom relief.
Vitamin E had no impact on bronchitis, ear infections, flu-like infections, pneumonia, sinus infections, or sore throats.