sine wave

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Related to Sinusoidal waveform: sine wave

Sine wave

A wave having a form which, if plotted, would be the same as that of a trigonometric sine or cosine function. The sine wave may be thought of as the projection on a plane of the path of a point moving around a circle at uniform speed. It is characteristic of one-dimensional vibrations and one-dimensional waves having no dissipation. See Harmonic motion

The sine wave is the basic function employed in harmonic analysis. It can be shown that any complex motion in a one-dimensional system can be described as the superposition of sine waves having certain amplitude and phase relationships. The technique for determining these relationships is known as Fourier analysis. See Wave equation, Wave motion

sine wave

[′sīn ‚wāv]
(physics)
A wave whose amplitude varies as the sine of a linear function of time. Also known as sinusoidal wave.

sine wave

A wave form containing only one frequency; the amplitude of the periodic oscillation is a sinusoidal function of time. Also see pure tone.

sine wave

(mathematics)
A waveform of a single constant frequency and amplitude that continues for all time.

Compare wavelet.

sine wave

A continuous, uniform wave with a constant frequency and amplitude. See wavelength.


A Sine Wave
References in periodicals archive ?
The sinusoidal waveform contained 144 graphical elements: 18 levels of luminance contrast approximating a sinusoid function that repeated 8 times.
The best winding configuration (for 18 slots) was used here, giving as sinusoidal waveform as possible (see Fig.
The system incorporates high frequency PWM technology to synthesize a precision regulated sinusoidal waveform with less than 5 percent total harmonic distortion at full load.
The source is applied five meshes inside the feedline in the propagation direction and the values of the electric fields are calculated during the sixth period of the sinusoidal waveform to avoid the transition-period effect.
The basic role of MLI is to sum up several small DC sources with suitable switching sequences to the array of power switches so as to obtain a multiple steps stair-case waveform which resembles the AC sinusoidal waveform.
Obviously, voltage waveform of the faulty phase is distorted compared to the sinusoidal waveform in the pre-fault condition.
This allows a maximum voltage swing of the rectified sinusoidal waveform which is rich in second harmonic signal content.
of voltage levels as the voltage waveform becomes closer to sinusoidal waveform [7].
For voltage sag/swell detection the software phase-locked loop developed in [13] is employed to lock the phase angle in the pre-fault value of the supply voltage and generate a sinusoidal waveform.
Any periodical waveform can be composing into a sinusoidal waveform at the fundamental frequency (50 or 60 Hz, depending on the network area) plus a number of sinusoids at harmonics frequencies.