Siouan


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Siouan

(so͞o`ən), branch of Native American languages belonging to the Hokan-Siouan linguistic family, or stock, of North and Central America (including Mexico). See Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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Siouan

 

a large family of languages spoken by many North American Indian tribes, which in the 17th and 18th centuries occupied an extensive area from the Mississippi River in the east to the Rocky Mountains in the west and from the Saskatchewan River in the north to the Arkansas River in the south.

The Sioux tribes were divided into three linguistic groups: Chiwere (the Iowa, Oto, and Missouri tribes), Dhegiha (the Kansa, Quapaw, Omaha, Osage, and Ponca), and Mandan (the Winnebago, Dakota, Crow, Mandan, and Hidatsa). Before the discovery of North America by Europeans, the ancestors of the Sioux lived in the southeast of North America and were among the founders of an advanced agricultural culture. Today’s Sioux Indians, who number approximately 100,000 (1973, estimate), are scattered on reservations in the USA and Canada. Working for hire is their main source of livelihood. The Sioux are active participants in the American Indian national liberation movement. [23–1432–]

References in periodicals archive ?
Originally, there were seven nations of people who all spoke mutually understandable dialects of the Siouan language.
The Cree allied themselves with the Assiniboine, a Siouan group living to the south of Lake Winnipeg, while the Teton-Lakota were often joined by the Dakota, the eastern branch of the Sioux nation, who occupied the upper Mississippi valley, and the Ojibwa, who inhabited the lands around Lake Superior but who were beginning to move south and westward.
Dorsey, "A Study of Siouan Cults," Bureau of American Ethnology 11th Annual Report (1889-90), 378.
especially the many Siouan tribes of the Dakotas, the Cheyenne, and the Arapaho-Gros Ventres.
Within this vast region are two subregions, the High Plains and the Prairies, which were home to American Indian tribal groups from six language families - Siouan, Caddoan, Algonquian, Athapascan, Uto-Aztecan, and Kiowa-Tanoan - plus the language isolate, Tonkawa.
But, named after the Maha tribe of the Siouan Indian, meaning "those going against the current of the wind," when all eyes were open, Omaha began to focus on a public safety strategy.
They were linguistically related to the Menominee, but culturally the latter were much closer to their neighbors in the Green Bay area--the Winnebago Indians--who may have numbered close to 4,000, even though this tribe was the sole representative this far east of the Siouan linguistic stock that was most commonly associated with tribes much farther west.
12) when indeed all divisions spoke dialects of the Siouan language.
Lowie, Indians of the Plains 96-97 (1954) (referring to the tribes of the Crow, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Pawnee); Terrell & Terrell, supra note 68, at 28-29 (matrilineal tribes included Iroquois, Siouan, Mohegan, Delaware, Powhatan, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Seminole, Caddoan linguistic family, Pawnee, Hidatsa, Mandan, Oto, Missouri, Crow, Navajo Hopi, Laguna, Acoma, and Zuni).
The long rectangular strips that made up the sides of the martingale appear to be men's legging strips in a Siouan style.