Charles Warren

(redirected from Sir Charles Warren)

Warren, Charles,

1868–1954, American lawyer and historian, b. Boston. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1892. An assistant U.S. Attorney General (1914–18), he served as a special master in important cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. He drafted the Espionage Act (1917), which was used to censor and imprison radicals. Warren is noted for his scholarly studies of constitutional history, especially The Supreme Court in United States History (3 vol., 1922; rev. ed., 2 vol., 1926, repr. 1960), which won the Pulitzer Prize. He also wrote Congress, the Constitution, and the Supreme Court (1925, repr. 1969) and The Making of the Constitution (1928, repr. 1967).
References in periodicals archive ?
Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Charles Warren was a senior Mason, along with his "eyes and ears" on the case Chief Inspector Donald Swanson.
The agency sent it straight to Sir Charles Warren, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police at Scotland Yard and the man charged with hunting down the monster.
Every time Abberline edges closer to a solution, he finds himself impeded by his boss, Sir Charles Warren (Ian Richardson).
For instance: that Commissioner Sir Charles Warren resigned not because of his failure to catch the Ripper, but because of a Home Office reprimand for writing a magazine article defending the police without first submitting it to Home Secretary Matthews; that an error of police judgement in all likelihood cost Doreen Marshall her life at the hands of Neville Heath when Sir Harold Scott, persuaded by Assistant Commissioner Ronald Howe, prevented the press from publishing Heath's photograph; that Mr.