Falstaff

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Falstaff

jovial knight and rascal of brazen braggadocio. [Br. Lit.: Merry Wives of Windsor; I Henry IV; II Henry IV]

Falstaff

“that swoln parcel of dropsies.” [Br. Drama: Benét, 339]
See: Fatness
References in periodicals archive ?
Tomorrow Terfel will reprise the role of Sir John Falstaff, who offers Mistress Ford and Mistress Page his unwanted romantic attentions.
Sir John Falstaff in Shakespeare's Henry IV, parts One and Two, is a comic role he had never really contemplated.
I like Henry because we see him develop from a young carefree man, who meets up with Sir John Falstaff and his cronies at the inn, to one who suffers the loss of his father and becomes King of England and, finally, to the King who leads his men into battle against the French at Agincourt.
The opera, whose central character is based on Shakespeare's Sir John Falstaff, is 'full of boisterous vulgarity, yet nobly magnificent'.
Eric Potts, best known as Diggory Compton in Coronation Street, was perfectly suited to play the self admiring, infamous fat and boisterous down on his luck knight Sir John Falstaff.
Playing Sir John Falstaff is considered one of the most difficult roles for a bass baritone, but Bryn relished the challenge.
William Shakespeare's fat, funny knight, Sir John Falstaff, is appearing weekends at Amazon Park.
More importantly, they do not turn "1 Henry IV" into a the Sir John Falstaff show despite the not inconsiderable presence of Geoff Elliott in the role of the fat knight.
Sir John Falstaff is a man who thinks so highly of himself he believes he can marry anyone and own anything.
Fat knight Sir John Falstaff tries pulling two ladies who decide to plot against him.
Sir John Falstaff espouses a "reformationist" distrust of the image and reflects, in his powerful combination of corporeal presence and punishing rhetoric, a proto-Protestant scorn for ornamentation and hypocrisy.
What it is, however, is a fantasie lyrique in which the characters of Shakespeare, Elizabeth I and Sir John Falstaff all play a part.