Balcon

(redirected from Sir Michael Balcon)
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Balcon

Sir Michael. 1896--1977, British film producer; his films made at Ealing Studios include the comedies Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951)
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Into the Light celebrates the career of Sir Michael Balcon at Parkside.
Day-Lewis, grandson of Brummie movie hero Sir Michael Balcon, is being talked of as an Oscar contender and no wonder.
Once he had returned home, Whale played several roles at the Birmingham Rep, including the assassin John Wilkes Booth in John Drinkwater's hit play, Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis, n grandson of Birmingham-born film legend Sir Michael Balcon - who gave Hitchcock his first di-recting job - is playing Lincoln in the new Steven Spielberg film of the same name, in cinemas from January 25).
I WAS pleased to see Sir Michael Balcon and Sir Alec Guinness honoured in Birmingham with their films shown at a local cinema.
Once he had returned home, Whale played several roles at the Birmingham Rep, including the assassin John Wilkes Booth in John Drinkwater's hit play, Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis, grandson of Birmingham-born film legend Sir Michael Balcon - who gave Hitchcock his first directing job - is playing Lincoln in the new Steven Spielberg film of the same name, in cinemas from January 25).
Many of Hitchcock's UK films to be screened in the upcoming celebration were produced by Birmingham's film knight, Sir Michael Balcon, who discovered the young Cockney film maker; provided him with an apprenticeship; nurtured his creative talents and gave him his first directing assignments.
Both his parents worked in the film industry and his father, Leslie, was particularly successful as an editor, producer and director, working for the great Birmingham movie mogul Sir Michael Balcon at Ealing Studios.
The role of city born Sir Michael Balcon, who gave Hitchcock his first gig and helped to found BAFTA.
Birmingham's own great film producer, Sir Michael Balcon, believed the cinema could promote 'a more progressive, egalitarian society'.