William Jackson Hooker

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Hooker, William Jackson

 

Born July 6, 1785, in Norwich; died Aug. 12, 1865, in London. English botanist. Father of J. D. Hooker.

In 1820, Hooker became a professor at the University of Glasgow. He was director of the Botanical Gardens in Kew (1841–65), which he developed into the greatest center for the study of world flora. One of the most prominent taxonomists of his time, he published numerous works on the flora of England, America, and Africa and on Pteropsida. He founded a number of journals and series, including Icones plantarum (1836), which is still being published.

WORKS

Species filicum, vols. 1–5. London, 1846–64.

REFERENCE

Hooker, J. D. “A Sketch of the Life and Labors of Sir W. J. Hooker.” Annals of Botany, 1902, vol. 16, no. 64.
References in periodicals archive ?
At various times Gunn also sent specimens to Sir William Hooker in Scotland and to John Edward Gray in London, perhaps for identification, although there is no information in the correspondence that this was provided.
Eventually moving to Glasgow's Botanic Gardens he came under the influence of the Professor of Botany, Sir William Hooker.
Looking across at an adjoining peak, Douglas estimated it to be about the same height--five thousand metres--and he named it Mount Hooker after Sir William Hooker, a distinguished Scottish botanist who had adopted the young Douglas as his protege.