Sirach


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Sirach: Apocrypha, Book of Sirach

Sirach

(sī`rək) or

Ecclesiasticus

(ēklē'zēăs`tĭkəs) [Lat. from Gr.,=ecclesiastical], book included in the SeptuagintSeptuagint
[Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which
..... Click the link for more information.
 and in the Roman Catholic canon of the Old Testament but not included in the Hebrew Bible and placed in the Apocrypha of the Authorized Version and Protestant Bibles since. It is called also the Wisdom of Jesus the Son of Sirach. A prologue states that the book was composed in Hebrew by one Jesus, son of Sirach, and translated into Greek by his grandson, Simeon son of Jesus son of Eleazar ben Sira. The date of the translation may be 132–131 B.C. The date of the composition of the original Hebrew text is 200–180 B.C. The excellence of wisdom and the teaching of wisdom are the main themes. Some important passages include the praise of wisdom leading into a protest against determinism; the identification of personified Wisdom with the law commanded by Moses; the praise of God for the works of nature; and the praise of the famous men of Israel. The book closes with a psalm. Although about two thirds of the Hebrew version has been recovered, there is much textual variation. The book is a good example of wisdom literature (see Wisdom of SolomonWisdom of Solomon
or Wisdom,
early Jewish book included in the Septuagint and the Vulgate but not in the Hebrew Bible. The book opens with an exhortation to seek wisdom, followed by a statement on worldly attitudes.
..... Click the link for more information.
).

Bibliography

See P. W. Skehan and A. A. Di Lella, The Wisdom of Ben Sira (1987). See also bibliography under ApocryphaApocrypha
[Gr.,=hidden things], term signifying a collection of early Jewish writings excluded from the canon of the Hebrew scriptures. It is not clear why the term was chosen.
..... Click the link for more information.
.


Sirach

(sī`rək), the father of the author of the book of SirachSirach
or Ecclesiasticus
[Lat. from Gr.,=ecclesiastical], book included in the Septuagint and in the Roman Catholic canon of the Old Testament but not included in the Hebrew Bible and placed in the Apocrypha of the Authorized Version and Protestant Bibles since.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
19) When we turn to Wirkungsgeschichte, or reception history, we find that the Adamic and Edenic traditions are linked in Ezekiel 28's treatment of the king of Tyre as well as Sirach 24's handling of Genesis 1-3, which Sirach appears to read as a unified whole.
19) He notes that Pieter Jansz Twisck, a particularly conservative Old Frisian historian, "appears to have had a particular preference for the books of Sirach and 1 and 2 Maccabees.
Die Frage nach dem Gluck des Menschen hat auch Jesus Sirach grundsatzlich nicht anders als Kohelet beantwortet.
Robert Gardner, read from the Book of Sirach, and Charlotte Williams read from I Corinthians and I John.
The Wisdom of Sirach (45:2), written by a Jew in the second century B.
14) See also Sirach 10:9, 17:32, and 40:3; and 2 Esdras 13:11.
A passage from the Ecclesiasticus (34:9), the book of the Bible also known as Sirach, which in the Vulgate is rather bland ("Vir in multis expertus cogitabit multa"), is sometimes translated as "A man that hath travelled knoweth many things.
The author of the Old Testament Book of Sirach (or Eccclesiasticus) knew a lot about human nature.
Sirach Capital Management, Seattle; Thompson Siegel & Walmsley, Richmond, Va.
Sometime before 180 BC, the book known as Ecclesiasticus, or the Wisdom of Jesus Son of Sirach (10:12), included the warning: "The beginning of human pride is to forsake the Lord; the heart has withdrawn from its Maker.
Stylistically, these writings are closely related to the tradition of wisdom literature, rooted both in such biblical books as Proverbs and Sirach and in such Egyptian texts as the Instructions of Ankhsheshonqy.