Sirionó

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Sirionó

 

an Indian tribe living in the tropical forests of eastern Bolivia. The Sirionós, who number approximately 1,000, speak a language of the Tupi-Guarani family. Various spirits are still worshiped by tribe members. The Sirionós are divided into nomadic matrilineal communities consisting of 30 to 120 individuals. Each community lives in a single hut, which is covered with palm leaves. The chief occupations are hunting and gathering. There is also some primitive agriculture; sweet manioc, maize, and yams are grown in natural clearings in the forest.

REFERENCE

Holmberg, A. R. Nomads of the Long Bow: The Sirionó of Eastern Bolivia. Washington, D.C., 1950.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Parakana are not the only Tupi-Guarani-speaking population of the Amazon known to have adopted hunter-gatherer economies after having lived as horticulturalists: other examples come from the Awa-Guaja, also from eastern Amazonia, and from the Siriono and Yuqui from the west.
If viewed as "ambiguous", women's peculiar status may on occasion bring about an inversion as, for example, among the Siriono of Brazil, for whom nature, maleness and raw food are in opposition to culture, femaleness and cooking (Ortner 1972: 86).
Nomadas del arco largo: los Siriono del oriente boliviano.
The sustainability of subsistence hunting by the Siriono Indians of Bolivia.
The Sorcerers," the most anthropological of these works, is about a real people, the Siriono, who live in the tropical forests of eastern Bolivia.
It just meant that one lot of hunters and collectors like the Siriono do this and other peoples don't.
His assessment, which generations of scholars took as gospel and applied to other indigenous groups, was that the Siriono were an unimpressive people who had existed for thousands of years without innovation or progress.
Holmberg also missed the fact that his subjects were impoverished and adrift for a reason: The fewer than 150 people he studied were the last survivors of more than 3,000 Siriono who had been nearly wiped out by epidemics in the 1920s.
Males more prominent Montagnais Alorese or women restricted in Salteaux Aranda religious rituals Kaska Kutenai Haida Hadatsa Omaha Aztec Creek Quiche Comanche Bribri Zuni Goajire Papago Callinago Cubeo Siriono Inca Trumai Kwoma Kurds Ajie Palauans Both participate, no Irish Iban restriction for women in Punjabi Kiman religious rituals Garo Marquesans Tanela Tuareg Truk Both, but women more Toradja prominent Tehuelche Missing Romans Siuai Kazak Pentecost Lolo Adamanese Lesu Computer Ready Data obtained from World Cultures Electronic Database.
The son of Wycliffe missionaries, he grew up with the Siriono of Bolivia and subsequently conducted anthropological research with another Amazonian minority group, the Aguaruna of northern Peru.
Siriono (Bolivia) 'Athough arrows, like bows, vary in size, only two general types are made: one, called uba, with a chonta head containing a lashed barb; the other called takwa, with a lanceolate bamboo head but no barbs .
About the same time', the Guaiaki moved southwards, reaching Paraguay, while the Siriono moved southwestwards, as far as Bolivia.