Sisera


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Related to Sisera: Jael

Sisera

(sĭs`ərə), in the Bible. 1 Canaanite captain, defeated by DeborahDeborah
, in the Bible, prophetess and judge of Israel, the only woman to hold that office. Under her guidance Barak conquered Sisera and delivered Israel from the oppression of the Canaanite King Jabin.
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 and BarakBarak
, in the Bible, leader from N Canaan who fought, with Deborah, against Jabin and Sisera.
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 and murdered by JaelJael
, in the Bible, heroine of the time of Deborah. She murdered Sisera, her guest.
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. 2 Family in the return to Palestine.

Sisera

a defeated leader of the Canaanites, who was assassinated by Jael (Judges 4:17--21)
References in periodicals archive ?
Rogers thinks it likely that Sisera "was a leader of a branch of the Sea Peoples, a term denoting several groups of immigrants to Palestine who came from various places in the Mediterranean basin (e.
On the basis of recent archaeological finds, Professor Adam Zertal of Haifa University maintains that Sisera belonged to the Shardana "Sea People" whose original home was the island of Sardinia.
32) Sisera is not depicted, nor is there any direct allusion to his presence nearby.
In scripture, Barak meets Jael only after she has murdered Sisera.
Collaborative research by SISERA members focuses on themes of education; health and nutrition; risk, vulnerability, and poverty dynamics; and empowerment and institutions.
Some projects that Cornell develops with the SISERA institutions require additional outside funding, and Cornell assists the research institutions in finding partners and other co-financing sources.
Mother and Child (1905), a delicate and tender watercolour of his lover by a young Pablo Picasso and Jael and Sisera (1620), a dramatic and striking biblical scene by Artemisia Gentileschi, are both on loan to the gallery from the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest.
When reading through Psalm 68, one cannot help noticing that some of the phrases used by King David are reminiscent of phrases sung by the prophetess Deborah after the victory of the Israelites over Sisera, general of Jabin (Judges Chapter 5).
In his discussion of all of this material Lassner brings in other biblical women and the roles they played, from possible prototypes of Sheba, like Jael, who enticed and slew Sisera, as contrasted with the prophetess and judge Deborah who did not challenge the foundations of society, especially as she is presented by the rabbinic commentators.
Up,' declares Deborah, for 'this is the day on which the Lord will deliver Sisera into your hands,' (Jud.
For the most part, these interpretations are obvious, part of the received tradition: Jael, the foreign woman, is the Church; her victory over Sisera is a conquest over carnal vices; the stake with which she kills the enemy is the wood of the cross.
One is reminded of what Gideon achieved with a mere 300 men, and how Barak's foot soldiers faced the overwhelming forces of the Canaanite coalition under Sisera.