Sisyphus


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Sisyphus

(sĭs`ĭfəs), in Greek mythology, son of Aeolus and founder and king of Corinth. Renowned for his cunning, he was said to have outwitted even Death. For his disrespect to Zeus, he was condemned to eternal punishment in Tartarus. There he eternally pushed a heavy rock to the top of a steep hill, where it would always roll down again. Albert Camus' essay The Myth of Sisyphus is based on this legend.

Sisyphus

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Sisyphus, asteroid 1,866 (the 1,866th asteroid to be discovered, on December 5, 1972), is approximately 7.6 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 2.6 years. Sisyphus was a mythological figure whose punishment in the underworld was to roll a stone up a hill, only to have it roll back to the bottom, and then have to push it up the hill, over and over again for eternity. According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Sisyphus represents “determination; dogged persistence; to start over (again or anew); to repeat effort.” Jacob Schwartz gives this asteroid’s astrological significance as “determined action on hopeless or repetitive tasks, ‘returning to square one.’” This asteroid’s key phrase is “start over.”

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Lang-Wescott. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Sisyphus

 

in Greek mythology, the son of Aeolus (the guardian of the winds) and the builder and king of Corinth.

After his death, Sisyphus was condemned in Hades to roll a heavy stone up a hill, which, every time it nearly reached the top, rolled down again. Hence the expression “Sisyphean labor,” which signifies endless and ineffective hard work and torments. Various myths have been preserved that explain why such a severe punishment befell Sisyphus. According to one myth, he is tormented for having disclosed the gods’ secrets. Sisyphus was portrayed in ancient Greek dramas, including non-extant works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. He has been represented in modern literature (A. Camus, R. Merle) and in art (Titian). [23–1053–]


Sisyphus

 

a genus of dung beetles whose black or brown body is 5-12 mm long. The legs are very long. The anterior tibiae are dentate, whereas the posterior tibiae are bent and lack denticles. There are 16 species, distributed mostly in the tropics of Africa and Asia. There is only a single species, S. schaefferi, in the USSR (southern region). Like the scarab, Sisyphus feeds on the excrement of animals, mostly ungulates. Before eating the dung, the beetle rolls it into small balls.

Sisyphus

man condemned to roll up a hill a huge stone which always rolls back before he gets it to the top. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1006]

Sisyphus

condemned to impossible task for his avarice. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 1011]
See: Greed

Sisyphus

condemned in Hades to roll boulder uphill which would immediately roll down again. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 244; Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas Odysseus's Sisyphus exists in a richly peopled part of the Greek underworld, Camus puts his Sisyphus alone on a mountain.
Nonetheless, unlike Sisyphus, the MB will remain at the bottom of the hill, being unable to ascend it again and for decades to come.
At the behest of Mary of Hungary (1505-558), he created a group of four paintings depicting the Damned in mythology: Tityos, Sisyphus, Tantalus, and Ixion--all condemned to perpetual torture for incurring the wrath of the gods.
Admittedly, Sisyphus needs a hand from its European partners.
Sisyphus and his boulder are fairly well established, even if his wife Merope tends to be neglected.
Sisyphus would have welcomed a bit of support, guidance and review, but think what he might have achieved with a block and tackle.
In fact, he seems to enjoy this punishment of Sisyphus, pumping out lively press releases like the one about the splendours of Barry's digital prowess which display a joie de vivre I often envy.
Jesse Mitchell's lengthy study of Turin Turambar uses two frameworks to examine his character and story: that of the Byronic Hero (with a side glance at the Gothic Villain in order to differentiate the two), and that of the Absurd Hero, exemplified by Camus's Sisyphus.
And old John Lines is like Sisyphus, that mythological King of Corinth punished in Hades by eternally rolling a block of marble uphill, whence it rolled down again, so he must repeat the process.
Salmoneus, King of Elis and brother of Sisyphus, shared his elder
By the end of the war in 1945 Camus had already published a number of key works, including "The Stranger" and "The Myth of Sisyphus," both in 1942.
Aa Various fingers were cut in various ways by various instruments and at several times during the day the prospect of there ever being a finished meal seemed as unlikely as Sisyphus managing to roll the stone atop his hill once and for all.