Sitka


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Sitka

(sĭt`kə), city (1990 pop. 8,588), Sitka census div., SE Alaska, in the Alexander Archipelago, on Baranof Island; inc. 1971. Fishing, its first industry, remains important; salmon, halibut, red snapper, crab, herring, abalone, and clams are caught. There are canneries, and tourism is also economically significant. Sitka was founded (1799) by Aleksandr BaranovBaranov, Aleksandr Andreyevich
, 1747–1819, Russian trader, chief figure in the period of Russian control in Alaska. When his Siberian business faltered, Baranov accepted (1790) an offer to become managing agent of a Russian fur-trading company on Kodiak Island.
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. Destroyed by Tlingits in 1802, the settlement was rebuilt as Novoarkhangelsk and became the flourishing capital of Russian America. There, in 1867, the United States officially took possession of Alaska from Russia. Renamed after the purchase of Alaska, Sitka remained the capital until 1900. The Univ. of Alaska Southeast campus and Sheldon Jackson College are in the city. Points of interest include Sitka National Historical Park, scene of a decisive battle (1804) between the Russians and the Tlingit; the Russian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Michael (built 1844–48); and Castle Hill, site of the transfer of Alaska to the United States, which is commemorated by the annual Alaska Day Festival in October. State logging championships are also held in Sitka. Mt. Edgecumbe, on an island to the west, can be seen from Sitka's harbor.

Sitka

 

a city in the USA, in southeastern Alaska, on the western coast of Baranof Island. Population, 3,400(1970).

Sitka is a port on the Pacific’s Sitka Sound. Industry is represented by pulp manufacturing and fishing. The city was founded in 1799 by the Russian-American Company and named Novoarkhangel’sk in 1804. In 1809 it became the administrative and chief commercial center for Russian settlements in America. In 1867, after Alaska was sold to the USA, Novoarkhangel’sk became the capital of Alaska and was renamed Sitka. In 1906 the capital was moved to Juneau. [23–1426–]

Sitka

a town in SE Alaska, in the Alexander Archipelago on W Baranof Island: capital of Russian America (1804--67) and of Alaska (1867--1906). Pop.: 8876 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Other than specific events, all of Sitka celebrates with programs at museums and parks, exhibits and displays, and historic sites and buildings tours.
Our thoughts and prayers are with those who are missing and all the people affected by the disasters in Sitka today," Walker said in a written statement provided by his office.
Delta will serve the top 15 destinations in the Western US with the addition of Boise, Denver and Sacramento, while Ketchikan and Sitka complete the top five destinations in Alaska.
But Sitka is eagles over a whale-filled sea, a rain forest where the only bears are grizzlies.
At the same time, if you crave a do-it-yourself Alaskan hunt but can't afford moose or caribou, Sitka deer may be the answer.
Sitka mountain rescue director Don Kluting said: "It's a miracle they survived.
Hoping to dominate the trading of sea-otter pelts and other goods, the Russian-American Company under Alexander Baranov established an outpost in Sitka Sound in 1799.
As a Sitka athlete, I understand its value, and am excited about helping bring such a solid clothing solution to the whitetail market," Simpson said.
9 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- West Coast Bank is the sole sponsor of Sitka Center for Art & Ecology's birthday celebrating the organization's 40-year history of providing educational experiences in art and ecology.
As a member and past chair of the board of directors of the $43 million ALPS Federal Credit Union in Sitka, Alaska, I would like to share with your readers an Alaskan story.
Brady established a relationship with Chief Saanaheit which would eventually lead to the giving of the totem poles that stand in Sitka National Historical Park.
The 61-foot tall Sitka Spruce takes centre stage in Church Street.