Siward


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Siward

(syo͞o`ərd), d. 1055, earl of Northumbria. A Danish warrior, he probably came to England with King Canute. At the behest of King Harthacanute in 1041 he ravaged Worcestershire and perhaps murdered Eadwulf of Northumbria; thereafter he was himself earl of Northumbria. He supported Edward the ConfessorEdward the Confessor,
d. 1066, king of the English (1042–66), son of Æthelred the Unready and his Norman wife, Emma. After the Danish conquest (1013–16) of England, Edward grew up at the Norman court, although his mother returned to England and married the
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 against Earl Godwin in 1051 and in 1054 defeated MacbethMacbeth
, d. 1057, king of Scotland (1040–57). He succeeded his father as governor of the province of Moray c.1031 and was a military commander for Duncan I. In 1040 he killed Duncan in battle and seized the throne.
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, king of Scotland, on behalf of Siward's nephew, later Malcolm III.
References in periodicals archive ?
Siward the Dane, unlike say Macduff, is a very real historical character.
That Malcolm has already perceived his country's desperate state becomes apparent enough in his assurances that at MacdufFs arrival he was wrapping up his preparations to sally forth with Old Siward, the Duke of Northumberland, and invade Scotland with ten thousand men (4.
Previously known as the TSS Dover, Earl Siward and the Sol Express, how was she better known on Teesside?
The turbine steamship TSS Dover - later renamed the Earl Siward, Sol Express and finally the Tuxedo Royale - was built in 1965 as a roll-on/roll-off ferry and spent much of her later life as a floating nightspot beneath the Tyne Bridge, before being laid up and left to rot on the banks of the River Tees in Middlesbrough.
Director Roxana Silbert's play chronicles the immediate aftermath of Macbeth's defeat at the Battle of Dunsinane, with Lady Macbeth (known as Gruach here and played with controlled power by Siobhan Redmond) a captive of the English commander Siward, played by Jonny Phillips as a strong but perhaps naive foil to Gruach.
And in the two leading roles - that of the English commander Siward and the king's widow Gruach - Jonny Phillips and Siobhan Redmond (her Highland accent a joy) are utterly compelling.
But clashes with the native population are inevitable, and the collision between the idealism of the invaders and the fury of the native population, usher in the idealist Siward (Jonny Phillipas in a well-shaped performance as a man who shows himself to be both fragile and commanding).
6) The last instance of this drift is when Siward says of his just-dead son, "Had I as many sons as I have hairs I would not wish them to a fairer death; And so his knell is knolled" (5.
But while this model works for the formal relations represented between Duncan and his sons and Old and Young Siward, it is somewhat simplified in its application to Banquo and Fleance, and Tromly himself has to modify it considerably for discussing Macduff and his son.
Where Macbeth is vilified for his disloyalty, Young Siward is honored for his death because a warrior in this society cannot die a "fairer death" than in protecting the clan (5.
By contrast, Macbeth in his earlier slaughter of young Siward was