Sixtus V


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Sixtus V,

1521–90, pope (1585–90), an Italian (b. near Montalto) named Felice Peretti; successor of Gregory XIII. He entered the Franciscan order in early youth. After ordination (1547) he became a famous preacher and was patronized by zealous leaders of the Counter ReformationCounter Reformation,
16th-century reformation that arose largely in answer to the Protestant Reformation; sometimes called the Catholic Reformation. Although the Roman Catholic reformers shared the Protestants' revulsion at the corrupt conditions in the church, there was present
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, notably Cardinal Carafa (later Paul IV), Cardinal Ghislieri (later St. Pius V), St. Philip Neri, and St. Ignatius of Loyola. From 1556 to 1560 he was counselor to the Inquisition in Venice, but his ardor caused trouble and he was recalled. In 1565 he went to Spain to look into the alleged heresy of the archbishop of Toledo and so seriously fell out with his companion, Cardinal Buoncompagni (later Gregory XIII), that they became enemies for life. He was created cardinal (1570) by St. Pius V. As pope, Sixtus V set about bringing order to the Papal States, which were at the mercy of brigands, and his methods, if violent, were successful. He spent a vast amount of money on the city of Rome, rebuilding countless churches, beautifying streets, and erecting new buildings and monuments. Sixtus left a tremendous surplus in the treasury by collecting new taxes, selling offices, and making loans. He reorganized the pontifical administration and the sacred college, which he set at the number of 70. He gave his sanction to Philip II of Spain's attempt to invade and restore Catholicism to England, an endeavor that ended in the defeat of the Spanish Armada. Sixtus V is one of the great figures of the Counter Reformation. He was succeeded by Urban VII.

Sixtus V

original name Felice Peretti. 1520--90, Italian ecclesiastic; pope (1585--90). He is noted for vigorous administrative reforms that contributed to the Counter-Reformation
References in periodicals archive ?
It did, and Pope Sixtus V, who was a great admirer of Elizabeth I and of Drake, thought that it would.
Pope Sixtus V, doubtful of the Armada's success, suspended judgement.
Thomas Aquinas, no less, this position held until 1588, when Sixtus V outlawed it.
London, Dec 28 (ANI): Mary Queen of Scots had sent a letter to Sixtus V, in which she asked for forgiveness for her sins and urged him to save her from the executioner's sword, according to a document kept in Vatican's secret archives.
While the letter addressed to Sixtus V failed to save Mary, Queen of Scots' life, the document itself has survived buried in the bowels of the Vatican's secret archives for more than 400 years.
Burdett's attitude to the muddle was far less tender and affectionate than the Dane's, and it was clear that, as a self-declared Roman, he would have been pleased if London had been ruled by a Sixtus V at some point.
There is good reason to regard the papacy of Sixtus V (1585-90) as a turning point of the Catholic Counter-Reformation and therefore of a new attitude to religious imagery--conveniently, one which was also essentially carried on by his successor, Pope Clement VIII, from 1592-1605.
At the end of the sixteenth century, Pope Sixtus V established a water supply to the hill areas in Rome.
Fifty years after the death of Clement VII in 1534, the papal throne was occupied by Pope Sixtus V, whose five-year reign (1585-1590) represented the culmination of this process of reconstruction.
The Cavazzi of Somaglia and Milan had the right to use the Visconti vipers on their arms, as shown to the left of her stemma, while the right side shows her husband's Peretti arms, invented for Sixtus V.
In 1585, Pope Sixtus V decided to make an urban and architectural move that had been under consideration for over a century.
Twenty years later, Pope Sixtus V added Saint Bonaventure.