Skipjack algorithm

Skipjack algorithm

A symmetric cryptographic algorithm developed by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA). It is used in the Department of Commerce's Escrowed Encryption Standard (EES), which was embodied in the CLIPPER chip.

The key to the encrypted message is itself encrypted with a key combined from two escrowed keys. The encrypted key and an identifier of the chip that sent it is encrypted again with a "family key." In this way, a law enforcement agency can use the family key to decrypt the outer layer and glean the chip ID, which is used to obtain the two escrowed keys that are combined to decrypt the key that decrypts the message. Skipjack uses an 80-bit key to encrypt 64-bit blocks, but algorithm details are classified. See CLIPPER chip.
References in periodicals archive ?
SenSec [16] uses a variant of skipjack algorithm called skipjack-X for generating the cipher text by introducing one more secret key without affecting the internal structure of the algorithm.
The network uses skipjack algorithm for encryption and decryption process.
Considering 80-bit keys uniform, node is 32 bit long, counter is 8 bit long, the keying and re-keying parameters are 320 bits long and the storage requirement for skipjack algorithm under CBC mode is 21366-bits.
The Fortezza Card (SEE BOX), for example, uses the Skipjack algorithm, which has eighty-bit keys.
Georgetown University professor Dorothy Denning, one of the evaluators of the Skipjack algorithm used in the proposed key-escrow arrangement and an advocate of its deployment, states that if the technology provided by Clipper catches on, it could become the de facto standard in the U.
Skipjack review interim report: The Skipjack algorithm.
Starting in late June, each of the five experts independently tested the SKIPJACK algorithm in a variety of ways, looking for potential flaws in the scheme.
While the government had convened a panel of learned cryptologists to examine the classified Skipjack algorithm, it had failed to inspire much confidence among the crypto establishment, most of whom were still disinclined to trust anything they couldn't whack at themselves.
In other words, they don't want devices or software out there that might use the Skipjack algorithm without depositing a key with the escrow holders.
In a recent discussion with a White House official, I asked for his help in getting the NSA to come out of its bunker and engage in direct and open discussions about crypto embargoes, key escrow, the Skipjack algorithm, and the other matters of public interest.
The Clipper Chip, based on the skipjack algorithm, was developed by the government as a telecommunications encryption device that met law enforcement concerns.