skunkworks

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skunkworks

A project undertaken by a highly motivated group of people who are given autonomy to work without the normal company restrictions. Typically referring to projects for software or electronics that are sometimes developed in secrecy, the term was derived from the Lockheed Martin Advanced Development Program "Skunk Works" and popularized by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin in their 1984 book "A Passion for Excellence."
References in periodicals archive ?
In partnership with the Air Force, Skunk Works continues to demonstrate how this next-level connectivity is possible through a series of projects designed to illustrate the tangible benefits of open mission systems (OMS).
Skunk Works is Pace's thirty-third book about airplanes and, perhaps, his best.
The success of Skunk Works was such that the name became a catchphrase for a business that produces advanced technology with high efficiency, and was mostly free of red tape and corporate meddling.
And as the Cold War heightened, the Skunk Works team designed and built the U-2 jet, the first spy plane.
Perle's enthusiasm was in total harmony with Skunk Works, which also breathlessly extols the F-117 for the boldness of its weird design, the heroic resourcefulness of the devoted team who saw the project through, and--most important--the dreamlike flawlessness of its performance in the booming heavens over Baghdad back in 1991.
While fusion itself is not new, the Skunk Works has built on more than 60 years of fusion research and investment to develop an approach that offers a significant reduction in size compared to mainstream efforts.
Since its creation in 1943, the Skunk Works, now part of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (Palmdale, California), has grown to three facilities: Burbank, California, Fort Worth, Texas, and Palmdale, California.
The airplane was built at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company -- Palmdale, popularly called the Skunk Works, with about $27 million of the company's own funding.
VentureStar's X33 prototype is currently under development at Lockheed-Martin's Skunk Works plant in Palmdale.
Before his current position with Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, Glasgow was previously the vice president of Engineering and Advanced Programs for the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, where he served on various X-35 proposal review teams and was deputy air vehicle product manager for the F-22 program.