slapstick

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slapstick

1. 
a. comedy characterized by horseplay and physical action
b. (as modifier): slapstick humour
2. a flexible pair of paddles bound together at one end, formerly used in pantomime to strike a blow to a person with a loud clapping sound but without injury

Slapstick

 

in the circus, theater, and motion pictures and on the variety stage, a highly comic method of portraying life. Slapstick involves behavior that is illogical and departs radically from generally accepted norms. It may include the bizarre use of props, for example, the playing of musical works on saws, frying pans, or brooms with strings stretched over them and with a resonator made from an ox bladder.

References in periodicals archive ?
This is a cracker of a story with plenty of slapstick humour and Troll is one of the funniest baddies I've read in a long time.
The latest version of the 1904 hit is packed with slapstick humour, making this children's favourite a hit for adults too.
GRAVITY-DEFYING stunts and slapstick humour aside, Cirque du Soleil's Alegria is a magical mystery of a show.
Slapstick humour is still there in spades, but the supporting cast are a little staid and the laugh-out-loud moments are spread more thinly over the 20-hour adventure.
not to mention the slapstick humour of comedian Andy Ford, aka Smee.
With Vinay you are bound to have a few laughs with his quick wit and slapstick humour and Lara adds to the glamour quotient.
Very young kids will enjoy the slapstick humour but there's not much here for adults.
There's original songs, slapstick humour, colourful costumes and masks, and an emphasis on audience participation.
Lots of visual gags, lame slapstick humour and hopefully no more sequels.
Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker (above) repeat their silly East meets West cop antics with loads of lame slapstick humour and so-called laughs.
The film doesn't overstay its welcome and the bright colours and slapstick humour guarantee giggles.
Having recently seen the play, your columnist can wholly vouch for its outstanding brilliance and slapstick humour and that poignant moment when the audience held its breath after spending most of the rest of the drama in side-splitting mode.