slasher

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slasher

Austral and NZ a wooden-handled cutting tool or tractor-drawn machine used for cutting scrub or undergrowth in the bush
References in periodicals archive ?
The slasher film spawned two sequels, 1998's "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer," which saw the return of original stars Hewitt and Prinze, and 2006's "I'll Always Know What You Did Last Summer," which featured an all-new cast, including Brooke Nevin and Torrey Devitto.
The first heralded the return of the slasher film, popularised by Wes Craven's Scream franchise (1996-2011) and I Know What You Did Last Summer (Jim Gillespie, 1997).
Second, the movie clearly lends itself to such a reading, even more so than slasher films.
Misrepresenting these light-hearted youth-centered date-movies as what Robin Wood called "violence-against-women movies" (1987, 79-85) was just one of the enterprising ways in which from 1982 to 1984 efforts to reenergize the ticket sales of teen slasher films were engineered, not by creatively-minded filmmakers but by resourceful distributors.
A NightmareC* of 1984, was amongst the first of the slasher films with teen protagonists.
Although the Halloween and Friday the 13th series share a great deal in the way they fit neatly into the slasher subgenre both structurally and ideologically, A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) and its sequels resist easy categorization even though the popular press conventionally lumped them in with all other slasher films.
Devotees of 80s slasher films like Halloween, Friday the 13th and the Elm Street series will relish Adam Green's old school late night horror.
Purpose of blog: I seem to have found a small niche where I can mix one part gay, two parts film nerd, and 10 parts horror-loving gore hound into a delicious stew that overflows with pictures of beefcakey guys bumping up against, say, ramblings about slasher films.
But, at least Mr Oakes adds: "We don't plan to go down the 'gore-nography' route of slasher films.
In fact, despite the genre's repetitive focus on monstrous killers (Michael Myers, Leatherface, Jason Voorhees, and Freddy Krueger) and sadistic acts of violence, slasher films all contain an underlying discourse concerning the proper nature of child rearing and family dynamics and the devastating consequences of alterations to these normative dimensions.
Ten years ago I edited an issue of CineAction titled "Murder in America" which dealt with various manifestations of violence in American films, mostly from the viewpoint of genre films: serial killers, murder mysteries, slasher films, police reality shows.
As with House Of 1000 Corpses, director Rob Zombie piles on the blood, gore and brutality while trying to slip in a few tributes to B-Movie slasher films.