snakebite

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snakebite,

wound inflicted by the teeth of a snake. The bite of a nonvenomous snake is rarely serious. Venomous snakes have fangs, hollow teeth through which poison is injected into a victim. All types of snake venom contain a toxin that affects the nerves and tends to paralyze the victim. In addition, the venom of the coral snake, the cobra, and the South American rattlesnake contains constituents that damage blood cells and dissolve the linings of the blood vessels and the lymphatic vessels, causing severe or fatal internal hemorrhage and collapse. First aid for venomous snakebites consists of retarding the spread of the poison through the circulatory system by applying a constricting band or an ice pack, or by spraying ethyl chloride on the wound. It is essential that the patient avoid exertion and the taking of stimulants, as both increase the pulse rate. The constricting band should be applied above the swelling caused by the wound; it should be tight, but not tight enough to stop the pulsing of the blood. If only a few minutes have passed since the infliction of the bite, it is possible to remove much of the poison by suction (see first aidfirst aid,
immediate and temporary treatment of a victim of sudden illness or injury while awaiting the arrival of medical aid. Proper early measures may be instrumental in saving life and ensuring a better and more rapid recovery.
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). Antivenins, which counteract the toxins, are available for most types of snake venom. The two main groups of poisonous snakes in the United States are the coral snakes, which rarely attack humans unless provoked, and the pit vipers (copperhead, cottonmouth moccasin, the various rattlers), which require no provocation.

snakebite

1. a bite inflicted by a snake, esp a venomous one
2. a drink of cider and lager
References in periodicals archive ?
It is apparent that most practitioners surveyed had never, or rarely, treated snake bites (Table 3).
Texas coral snake bites frequently produce local effects in many patients.
In fact, the low incidence of fatal snake bites in Australia suggests that, on the whole, our venomous snakes may be less willing to attack people than those elsewhere in the world.
If a snake bites your cat or dog, keep the animal calm and immediately take it to a vet for treatment
Scientists hope to use the mongoose's secret weapon to create anti-venom drugs that protect people against snake bites.
Studies indicate that without antivenin treatment, hospital stays for venomous snake bites average twice as long (about 6.
Donna Seger, Executive Director of Tennessee Poison Center and an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said that "the majority of people suffering from snake bites survive them if they're treated on time.
Antivenoms have been available for the treatment of snake bites for more than 110 years, and are considered to be the most effective treatment with which to neutralise injected venom.
He said after start production of anti-snake venom sera it will not only save lives from snake bites but also reduce foreign exchange being spent on purchase of sera from abroad.
There have only been a handful of recorded snake bites in Huddersfield over the last 100 years
A biologist at a Welsh university has won an international award for work which could save injuries and deaths from snake bites in Asia.
When a snake bites a person, immediate professional medical care is needed.