Snawley

Snawley

sanctimonious hypocrite; placed stepsons in Dotheboys Hall. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
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Pounds for two, I think, Mr Squeers,' said Mr Snawley, solemnly.
Every wholesome luxury, sir, that Yorkshire can afford,' continued Squeers; 'every beautiful moral that Mrs Squeers can instil; every-- in short, every comfort of a home that a boy could wish for, will be theirs, Mr Snawley.
I should wish their morals to be particularly attended to,' said Mr Snawley.
I have the satisfaction to know you are, sir,' said Mr Snawley.
rejoined Mr Snawley, looking at the poor little urchin as if he were some extraordinary natural curiosity.
exclaimed Mr Snawley, as they walked into the next box.
Snawley was a sleek, flat-nosed man, clad in sombre garments, and long black gaiters, and bearing in his countenance an expression of much mortification and sanctity; so, his smiling without any obvious reason was the more remarkable.
No,' rejoined Snawley, meeting the gaze of the schoolmaster's one eye.
And this,' resumed Snawley, 'has made me anxious to put them to some school a good distance off, where there are no holidays--none of those ill-judged coming home twice a year that unsettle children's minds so--and where they may rough it a little--you comprehend?
And in the matter of fact besides,' interrupted Mr Snawley.