Prose Edda

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Prose Edda

 

(also Snorri’s Edda, Younger Edda), a work written by the Icelandic prose writer and poet Snorri Sturluson between 1222 and 1225. The Prose Edda is divided into a prologue and three parts. Many of the pagan myths recounted in the work appear in no other source. In one section Snorri explains the significance of the kennings (metaphorical expressions) and heiti (poetic synonyms) used in skaldic poetry and illustrates his explanations with examples from the works of the skalds. The Prose Edda also contains an original narrative poem with a prose commentary in a style reminiscent of a scholastic treatise.

PUBLICATION

In Russian translation:
Mladshaia Edda. Afterward by M. I. Steblin-Kamenskii. Leningrad. 1970. (Contains bibliography.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The work is also called Snorra Edda (the title used from here onwards), after its author, Snorri Sturlusson (1179-1241).
The Snorra Edda is said to have "unquestionably influenced [Borges's] literary presentation of illusory and real worlds" (247) and in particular a vivid analysis of "El Sur" elicits this parallelism.
A discussion of the influence of Snorra Edda, in particular the second and third sections ("Skaldskaparmal" and "Hattatal"), on Borges's early work on kennings will serve as a starting point.
In 1932 Borges's article "Noticia de los kenningar" (sic) appeared in the journal Sur and a connection with the Snorra Edda was definitively forged.
Of the list of kennings given by Borges, the majority are traceable to Snorra Edda or to the Njals saga (in the translation of Webbe Dasent referred to in the bibliography at the end of the essay).
Moreover the sections on Snorri and the Snorra Edda find their way in an only slightly revised form into the introduction of La alucinacion de Gylft.
It would have also been a challenge, judging by Borges's earlier description of the Snorra Edda as a "calmoso Gradus ad Parnassum" (the same book which Borges the character gives to Funes in "Funes el memorioso" in order to quash his budding interest in Latin).
This verse, which explains the relocation of a clod of Swedish land and the mythical origins of Zealand in Denmark, is the first to appear in Snorra Edda.
Nevertheless, the line between linguistic and literary interpretation is a difficult one to draw; though there is much on Ingeld in the Introduction and ad locitum, there is no reference to the similarities between the story of Herebeald and Haedhcyn and the account of Hodhr and Baldr in the Snorra Edda.
The Younger or Prose Edda, also called the Snorra Edda (early 13th century), was written by Snorri Sturluson.