social distance


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social distance

feelings or relations of ‘aloofness and unapproachability’, especially between members of different social strata. Conceptions of social distance are formally institutionalized in extreme systems of SOCIAL STRATIFICATION, such as APARTHEID and CASTE, but informally they exist in all societies. The term was introduced by PARK and Burgess (1924) and popularized by Bogardus (1933), who also formulated a social-distance (or Bogardus) scale, designed to portray the extent of tolerance or intolerance between social groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team also found that fMRI response similarities could be used to predict not only if a pair were friends but also the social distance between the two.
Thus, informed by psychological distance theory and CLT, we conducted three studies to examine if event abstractness and social distance have a joint influence on self-other risk perception differences.
2011), the reward was divided with one other person of varying social distance from the participant (i.
H1: The level of support for hypotheses deduced from the pure sociology framework varies inversely with the social distance between those involved in analyzing the evidence and pure sociology's inner core.
The distribution, influence and comparison of internalised and perceived stigma, social distance and impairment level across selected variables (age, sex-difference, marital status, occupation, educational status).
college students will show less knowledge, recognition, and help-seeking attitudes, and more social distance and negative attributions toward schizophrenia than will U.
The level of stigmatisation was assessed by personal attributes, (21) emotional reactions, (21) social distance, (22) and attitude.
Therefore, strategic consumer behavior and short-sighted consumer behavior will inevitably be affected by other dimensions of psychological distance - such as the impact of social distance between consumers and businesses.
Discourse Particles in Context: Reducing and Increasing Social Distance
Eveland, Nathanson, Detenber, and Mcleod (1999) explained that social distance is an important concept that may partially account for variations in TPP gaps.
The rest of the article is based on an adapted ecological model for studying career barriers for Chinese immigrants that is an integration of Bogardus's (1933) social distance theory and Bronfenbrenner's (1977, 1979) ecological systems theory of human development.
Compounding the problem is ostracism through what is known as social distance.