soda-lime glass


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soda-lime glass

[′sōd·ə ¦līm ‚glas]
(materials)
Glass made by fusion of sand with sodium carbonate, or sodium sulfate and lime, or limestone; used for window glass.

soda-lime glass

Glass manufactured by fusing sand with sodium carbonate or sodium sulfate and lime; used for window glass.
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The glass transition temperature for soda-lime glass is (500-600[degrees]C), while melting temperature is about (1000[degrees]C)[4].
For example, SCHOTT uses floated soda-lime glass as its basic substrate and this process to produce certain types of specialty glasses, including high-quality BOROFLOAT borosilicate glass with the best possible thermal, chemical and optical properties, as well as strong, scratch-resistant aluminosilicate glass, even in thin form.
Cospheric also offers a selection of PMMA, ceramic, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, silica, stainless steel, silver-coated, and titanium dioxide-coated spheres, some available in spacer grades with very tight particle size distributions.
This paper documents experiments focused on the impact performance of several alternative thin laminate constructions under consideration for windshield applications (including conventional annealed soda-lime glass as well as laminates utilizing chemically strengthened glass), for the purpose of identifying new and unique failure modes that result from thickness reduction.
In the study [3], grooving and cutting tests were carried out to evaluate cutting performance of soda-lime glass using an ultraprecision lathe with a single-crystal diamond tool.
The facility will be dedicated to the production of ultra-thin glass, which is soda-lime glass, used as cover glass for the touch-screens of notebook computers and other electronic devices.
iridium single crystal, and self-sustained fracture waves in a soda-lime glass.
Soda-lime glass is the most common type of glass (used for windows, jars and drinking glasses).
Gorilla is two to three times stronger than chemically strengthened versions of ordinary soda-lime glass, even when just half as thick, company scientists say.
Soda-lime glass lends itself to larger and somewhat less intricately decorated creations than borosilicate glass.
Old time surveying involved an acid tube method of using a soda-lime glass tube partially filled with solution of hydrofluoric acid to determine the direction of their bore holes.
For example, a typical soda-lime glass has a refractive index of 1.