sodomite

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sodomite

a person who practises sodomy
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than introduce here certain Renaissance contexts for understanding friendship, such as the Classical, Humanist, and sodomitical, they will be brought up when they are relevant to local interpretation, so that their value can best be appreciated.
Such ambivalent homoeroticism as Melville registers in Redburn's monument scene and sodomitical culture, according to Greven, also finds voice in the language of the shudder: in scenes where one man gazes or thinks on another man, Hawthorne and Poe as well as Melville use shuddering as code for both the fear and the pleasure of queer desire.
Who next might be identified as performing sodomitical relations?
The popular motif of sodomitical relations among monks provides another piquant confirmation of the laity's awareness that monastics are not at all averse to love and sexuality.
As Jon Thomas Rowland writes in his reading of the case, the trial "raises too many questions, and suggests too many possibilities, simply to expose the sodomitical Hearne and vindicate the heterosexual Bradbury, as it was meant to do" (89).
She argues that analyzing the aesthetic, long associated with the subordinated yet liberating viewpoints of the feminine and sodomitical, enables a critique of the ideology in which contemporary critical discourse is deeply implicated.
Chapter 3, "'Dung, Guts, and Blood': Sodomy, Abjection, and the Gothic," offers a very interesting analysis of the cross-pollination between "scandalous sodomitical reports" of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries which themselves employ conventions of the Gothic and the ways in which the language of sodomy trials and newspaper reports found its way into Gothic works, particularly those like Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and James Hogg's The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner that focus on male same-sex relations.
1660-1715), a collection of satirical poems about sodomites, then proceeding to interpret the Abbe de Boisrobert's cabinet as the proverbial "closet" of secrets and disclosure (1641-49), and ending with Theophile de Viau's trial (1623-25) and his strategic (and ambiguous) sodomitical "self," Seifert claims to "complicate a reductive narrative of the emergence of a recognizably 'modern' conception of the homosexual, 'homosexuality,' or a subculture in this period" (157).
If, as some critics have averred, Quevedo's writings reveal his latent homosexual tendencies, the author's misogyny and apparently negative views of sodomitical behavior ironically uncover his fear that the "other" remains internalized not only within the social body, but within his own, unwilling and unable to be dislodged.
The man's act is thus necrophiliac as well as sodomitical and pedophiliac.
Vin Nardizzi finds literary plant-grafting tropes a rich reservoir of Elizabethan sexual comment as in Shakespeare's Henriad, where Hal's relations to Falstaff and the princess Catherine, Nardizzi argues, both thus appear to be sodomitical mixtures.
89) For Bowers, part of the rational basis for sodomy laws was a presumably historic, uninterrupted, Judeo-Christian moral aversion to homosexuals and their sodomitical acts.