sodomite

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sodomite

a person who practises sodomy
References in periodicals archive ?
The reports described one house in the rue Saint-Denis as an "abode of pederasts" (8 January 1782), but they connected one type of address with sodomitical sociability and sexuality more frequently than others: taverns, which they regarded as sites and sources of disorder.
reason not to engage in sodomitical and other nonmarital sex acts.
Her essay could in many ways be the volume's perfect vehicle for thinking about how the backward gaze of sodomitical power brokering is passed over, deconstructed, or emulated in a same-sex female political and sexual economy.
How then should we read this shift in the identity of the sodomitical character from the Turkish villain in the Elizabethan play to the English traveler in the Jacobean drama?
Indeed, McFarlane doesn't overlook the fact that representations of "the sodomite" could be enabling: "[S]odomitical practices constitute the discursive field within [which] sodomitical desire can be, not simply excoriated, but also articulated" (22).
If, however, Queer Virgins makes a strong case that the plays of one particular company allow for the expression of a sodomitical voice, the book nevertheless raises vexing questions about the larger historiographic project it is involved in.
In La cazzaria, the elitism of sodomitical sex comes in part from its rejection of the female.
Figurations of sodomitical royal patronage -- in literary fictions and libels -- reflect this concern.
Add to these representations the debate over cross-dressing on the Elizabethan stage, which Stephen Gosson and others condemned as promoting sodomitical behavior, and we can see that the issue of homoeroticism was a controversy of some note in Elizabethan England (Levine 1982, 121-43; Howard 1988, 418-40; Rackin 1987, 29-41; Jardin 1983; Traub 1992; Goldberg 1992).
For Halpern, the sodomitical residues of this precipitation persist sub-rosa in the language of the Young Man sonnets.
No matter how much they grumbled, they probably did not assume that one sodomitical encounter with him would transform their Sons into lifelong sodomites.
In the 1960s, scholars were still anxious to purify the great artist from any taint of sodomitical desire, let alone behavior; even Clements, who frankly discussed Michelangelo's several male infatuations, dismissed them in Freudian terms as infantile, since "he never matured emotionally to the point of having a sustained love affair with a woman" (185).