sandblow

(redirected from Soil liquefaction)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

sandblow

[′san‚blō]
(ecology)
A patch of coarse, sandy soil denuded of vegetation by wind action.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are nearly 4 million households in Taiwan living in such buildings across Taiwan, Hsu said, and many of them in Taipei are particularly vulnerable because they sit in areas with a strong potential for soil liquefaction, where soil loses its strength and stiffness in an earthquake.
This was likely caused by soil liquefaction, when the ground beneath a building loses its solidity under stress such as that caused by an earthquake.
Using biological materials as flame retardants, defining the characteristics of soil liquefaction during earthquakes and collecting disaster data with aerial drones are among the 12 disaster resilience research projects awarded just over $6 million today by the U.
Continued export woes and the release of the soil liquefaction map will weigh on the outlook for Taiwan's construction sector.
Workshop on Earthquake resistant Design of Lifeline Facilities and Countermeasures Against Soil Liquefaction.
Soil liquefaction happens in earthquakes and other situations where soils briefly soften and allow what is built on them to sink.
Based on the computation of values of Cyclic Stress Ratio (CSR) and Cyclic Resistance Ratio (CRR), the methodology brings forth the values that depict the soil liquefaction susceptibility.
The areas will be evaluated by the Department of Science and Technology and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) to ensure that these are safe from storm surge, flood, erosion, landslide, volcanic eruption and soil liquefaction, according to Lacson, presidential assistant for rehabilitation and recovery.
Simplified Procedure for Evaluating Soil Liquefaction Potential Journal of soil Mechanics and Foundation Division ASCE Vol.
2002), soil liquefaction (Baziar and Jafarian, 2007, Baziar et al.
The information provided by environmental drilling allows remedies to be created before hazardous substances are released; it can help in assessing whether an area is at risk of natural threats such as earthquakes, landslides, sinkholes, soil liquefaction and debris flows.
Seed and Idriss [1] have done comprehensive study on soil liquefaction and proposed a soil liquefaction assessment based on the soil parameters from laboratory as well as field tests.