Soissons


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Soissons

(swäsôN`), city (1990 pop. 32,144), Aisne dept., N France, on the Aisne River. It is an agricultural and industrial center. Soissons was an old Roman town and early episcopal see. Its strategic location has made it the scene of many battles throughout history. Clovis I defeated the Roman legions at Soissons in 486, and the city was the capital of several MerovingianMerovingians,
dynasty of Frankish kings, descended, according to tradition, from Merovech, chief of the Salian Franks, whose son was Childeric I and whose grandson was Clovis I, the founder of the Frankish monarchy.
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 kings (5th–7th cent.). Pepin the Short dethroned Childeric III there in 751; and Robert I, grandfather of Hugh Capet (see CapetiansCapetians
, royal house of France that ruled continuously from 987 to 1328; it takes its name from Hugh Capet. Related branches of the family (see Valois; Bourbon) ruled France until the final deposition of the monarchy in the 19th cent.
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), was killed in battle at Soissons in 923. Throughout the 19th and 20th cent. the city was the scene of warfare, culminating in the German invasion of 1940. Part of the Abbey of Saint-Jean-des-Vignes (where Thomas à Becket lived for several years) survives, as does the nearby Abbey of St. Médard, a burial place of Merovingian kings. The Gothic Cathedral of Saint-Gervais and Saint-Protais (12th–13th cent.) has stained-glass windows by Rubens.

Soissons

 

a city in northern France, in the department of Aisne; situated on the Aisne River. Population, 28,000 (1968). Soissons has machine-building, metalworking, chemical, and rubber industries.

Soissons

a city in N France, on the Aisne River: has Roman remains and an 11th-century abbey. Pop.: 29 453 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
Important for de Jong's interpretation of Louis's public penance at Soissons is the second Apologia of one of the bishops present, the ever-combative Agobard of Lyons, a treatise which de Jong convincingly dates to the months between July and October 833.
The anticipation was palpable when the Oklahoma group met at the Gare du Nord train station in Paris to take the hour-long trip to Soissons.
Nancy Black considers iconographic types of Mary herself in the illuminated Soissons manuscript.
Figure 1 shows that in neither To nor T is there any correlation between the order of the CSM and the order of these Soissons narratives in Farsitus or in any of the other compilations linked to the CSM, so the structural and archival source must be presumed to be a Soissons cluster created by the scriptorium.
Yet, Hardy's attribution of RS 1887 to Raoul de Soissons is largely based on stylistic similarities between RS 1887 and RS 7000 on the one hand, and between RS 700 and other songs by Raoul de Soissons on the other.
The author provides a whole chapter on the use of tanks in British war bond rallies, while devoting only one sentence to the Battles of Soissons and Amiens in 1918 that proved the decisive role the weapon could play, and which provided the basis for much of the reputation associated with armored forces.
The sprinters have had the upper hand thus far and that should again be the case today as the 189-strong field - there have been no dropouts - wend their way westwards from Soissons to Rouen.
The actual history of the saints is uncertain, but according to their legend they were Roman brothers who came to Soissons in Gaul.
Army War College, and the late Rolfe Hillman, an accomplished writer and military authority, break from this uncritical mold in Soissons, 1918.
Show manager Max de Soissons said: "They are just too tacky for Tatton.
Relying on primary texts, provided at length in the Latin, as well a stupendous collection of secondary literature, Marenbon traces Abelard's life from his earliest studies with Roscelin and William of Champeaux to his appearances before the Councils of Soissons (1121) and Sens (1140) to his death outside Cluny in 1142.
The "Moroccan Poilus" were part of trench warfare in the battles of La Marne and l'Aisne, Soissons in January 1915, in Verdun in 1916, in the sector of la Main de Massige, in the village of Brueil, on the road from Paris to Soissons, and in Villers-aux-Erables.