Solenodontidae


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Solenodontidae

[sō‚lē·nə′dänt·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The solenodons, a family of insectivores belonging to the group Lipotyphla.

Solenodontidae

 

a family of mammals of the order Insectí vora. The body length is 28–32 cm, and the tail length, 17–25 cm. The weight reaches 1 kg. The facial part of the head is considerably elongated, and the nostrils open to the sides. There is a deep fissure on the second lower incisor. The feet are relatively large. The body is covered with short reddish brown or blackish fur. The tail is bare. The family comprises one genus, Solenodon, which has two species: the almique (S. cubanus), distributed in Cuba, and the agouta (S. paradoxus), distributed in Haiti. Both the almique and the agouta are terrestrial nocturnal animals, inhabiting forests and shrub thickets. Natural depressions and cracks serve as shelters. The diet includes animals and plants. The almique and agouta breed once a year, giving birth to three offspring. Both are rare and are included in the Red Data Book of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.