Solzhenitsyn


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Solzhenitsyn

Alexander Isayevich . born 1918, Russian novelist. His books include One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962), The First Circle (1968), Cancer Ward (1968), August 1914 (1971), The Gulag Archipelago (1974), and October 1916 (1985). His works criticize the Soviet regime and he was imprisoned (1945--53) and exiled to Siberia (1953--56). He was deported to the West from the Soviet Union in 1974; all charges against him were dropped in 1991 and he returned to Russia in 1994. Nobel prize for literature 1970
References in periodicals archive ?
In March 1917, Solzhenitsyn attempts the impossible and succeeds, evoking a fully formed world through episodic narratives that insist on the prosaic integrity of every life, from tsars to peasants.
Hay que volver a leer con otros ojos, ajenos a la guerra fria, a Alexandr Solzhenitsyn.
An Anguished Love of Country: Solzhenitsyn's Paradoxical Middle Ground" thematically explores and decisively refutes the argument that Solzhenitsyn was an uncritical Great Russian nationalist.
But as Solzhenitsyn said at Harvard in June 1978, the American Founding also drew on an older Western tradition with its "rich reserves of mercy and sacrifice"
Del cristianismo de Solzhenitsyn, que no encuentra dogmatico ni inquisitorial, le conmueve la busqueda de la verdad y el ejercicio de la caridad, virtudes que encontrara en Jose Revueltas, a quien recordara como "el verdadero cristiano" de la literatura mexicana por haber roto con el "clericalismo marxista" y espiritualmente superior al persignado Jose Vasconcelos, quien "termino abrazando el clericalismo catolico".
Mrs Natalya Solzhenitsyn told reporters that her husband had telephoned her from West Germany.
It was startling to see Solzhenitsyn being shaken by the hand by any ruler of Russia, let alone an ex-KGB officer, remembering, as many of us do, the breathtaking courage of the man with the coarse beard, sombre and deeply lined face and fearless outbursts who set himself up as a one-man opposition to the whole weight and apparatus of the Soviet state.
However, Solzhenitsyn was so successful at covering his tracks that I couldn't find out nearly enough to satisfy me, and I simply gave up.
Now Solzhenitsyn and John Paul 11 are both dead, but each man irrevocably altered the course of history: Solzhenitsyn, by his heroic witness to truth amidst the freezing darkness of the Gulag Archipelago; and Karol Wojtyla--"a man from a far country" as he called himself--over the next 27 years of his Papacy.
From then on Solzhenitsyn never ceased to be a public figure as well as a writer.
The death of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn earlier this year reminds us of the powerful impact of his One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich.
To mark the August death of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, one of the greatest of Russia's writers and a leading Soviet dissident, American Diplomacy seeks to honor his life by reconsidering the June 8, 1978, observations he offered to graduates of Harvard University.