Soranus


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Soranus

(sərā`nəs), fl. 1st–2d cent. A.D., Greek physician, probably b. Ephesus. He is believed to have practiced in Alexandria and in Rome and was an authority on obstetrics, gynecology, and pediatrics. His treatise On Midwifery and the Diseases of Women (tr. 1882) remained an influential work until the 16th cent.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our practice, we sit down to perform a vaginal delivery, as taught by Soranus of Ephesus.
Soranus claims that the clitoris is called "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" because it "withdraws like a bride": "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" (1927 1.
1) mentioned uterine inversion, as did Soranus of Ephesus in 110 A.
A physician of the time, Soranus, who lived around 100 years BC concluded from his observations of this illness that the nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was more severe when there was a male foetus (Moshe et al, 1994, p.
Vaginal hysterectomy was chronicled and performed by the Greek physician Soranus of Ephesus in 120 a.
laying a hyena's right paw on the woman) and reasonable treatments as provided by Soranus is particularly interesting.
The first abdominal hysterectomy was performed by Charles Clay in 1943 and first vaginal hysterectomy was performed by Soranus of Ephesus in 120 A.
In his explanation of the ideal midwife, Soranus explains that she should possess theoretical and literary knowledge as well as practical experience.
Thus Soranus, the author of an important tract on the subject, gives explicit counsel about the condition of the breasts and of the milk the wet nurse should possess, but his primary concern is her age and character.
Those who believe male and female contributions to conception are parallel could be led to the assertion that if a woman conceives as the result of a rape, she must have had an appetite for sex, even if, as Soranus puts it, she repressed the knowledge from herself.
Mas tarde, Hipocrates y el obstetra griego Soranus la describieron (9) asi como el medico renacentista Eduard Strother (11).
on abortifacients] in the Hippocratic Oath is probably rooted in medical concern for the mother rather than in ethical concern for the foetus"); for Soranus it was better to prevent conception than to kill an embryo, but he allowed abortion (Gyn.